5 minute, succulent, chocolate lover's torte! \I made it last night and substituted 1 cup oat meal for the cashews and wheat germ. I did use the soaked almonds. I found this on a forgotten site and I cannot claim its incredible qualities. Use your Salton Nut grinder for easy work space convenience or Vitamix...

Recipe Directions

1. Soak 2 cups of almonds overnight and sprout for one day. This yields approximately 2 2/3 cups “sprouted” almonds. Place the sprouted/soaked almonds in a food processor. A blender will not work!

2. Add 1/2 to 3/4 cups cocoa powder (the kind used for baking) or carob powder. Cocoa powder is more chocolatey but you can substitute 4 ounces of unsweetened baker’s chocolate which you must melt gently over low heat, cool, and then add.

3. Add pure maple syrup, raw honey (honey is usually strong and will add its own flavor), rice syrup, barley syrup, or dates (preferably honey dates, which are very gooey and very sweet).

4. Add nut butter, toasted wheat germ (optional, but it adds a little stiffness and creates a bit of a flour texture), and vanilla bean.

5. Pulse/blend all of these ingredients until fairly smooth. If you like a few chunks, that’s fine. If you want it smoother, pulse/blend more.

PAN/MOLD

6. Use a 4 inch diameter springform pan.

7. If making your own mold, take a pint or quart plastic container and cut a ring about 2 1/2 inches tall out of it. The ring needs to be topless and bottomless. If you are using the homemade mold: Place it on a plate, like a pie plate.

8. Carefully put the batter in the form. Freeze for at least 4 hours.

9. Gently remove when frozen. A sharp paring knife run all around the inside may help to loosen it. Also rubbing a tiny amount of oil or coconut butter around the inside before filling will help release the torte from the mold. You may then lift the torte with a spatula onto your serving plate—or you can freeze it right on the plate!

10. Decorate it any way you wish or just keep it plain. Fruit garnish, coconut, and slivered almonds are great!

Drhall's Thoughts

By drhall

5 minute, succulent, chocolate lover's torte!

\I made it last night and substituted 1 cup oat meal for the cashews and wheat germ. I did use the soaked almonds.

I found this on a forgotten site and I cannot claim its incredible qualities. Use your Salton Nut grinder for easy work space convenience or Vitamix processor.

I did not use the called for wheat germ. It has been toasted to eliminate something many may not be aware of--phytic acid.

Wiki: Phytic acid is found within the hulls of nuts, seeds, and grains In-home food preparation techniques can reduce the phytic acid in all of these foods. Simply cooking the food will reduce the phytic acid to some degree.

More effective methods are soaking in an acid medium, lactic acid fermentation, and sprouting.

Phytic acid is a strong chelator of important minerals such as calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc and can therefore contribute to mineral deficiencies in people whose diets rely on these foods for their mineral intake such as those in developing countries.

In this way, it is an anti-nutrient.

For people with a particularly low intake of essential minerals, especially young children and those in developing countries, this effect can be undesirable.

Note: Almonds will not actually sprout. They will plump up with the water they soak in. They are commonly called soaks instead of sprouts because of that.

Just the same they are wonderful: delicious and nutritious.

Once a dormant (dry) seed soaks up water, it comes to life, and it is that life that makes sprouts and, in this case, soaks so nutritious.

The amount of sweetness will be a somewhat personal choice. The 1/2 cup suggested is probably the minimum amount one would want to add but experiment! You can always add more.

Note: when fully frozen, the torte will taste slightly sweeter than it will at room temperature.

Peanut butter is yummy; cashew butter adds little flavor of its own but contributes a rich texture, as do all the nut butters. You can omit the nut butter altogether, however, we find that the creamy oils attenuate the “icy” mouth-feel of the dessert.

I have not tried seed butters, like sesame, but those might substitute well, too. If using seed butters, you should use only soaked raw seeds and nuts which contain phytic acid that, once eaten, readily bond to minerals such as iron, zinc and calcium, preventing their absorption in the body.

Sprouting or dehydrating-heating reduces or eliminates phytic acid.

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Comments

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You are talking right up my alley!!! FYI~ Enjoyed your site, great job is this still your passion???

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wait - but what about the oats you mentioned?

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Much Much better at room temp!! after freezing, the very cold does not do well for the flavors in my opinion ...

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wait - but what about the oats you mentioned?

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1 vote
+
Vote up!
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You are talking right up my alley!!! FYI~ Enjoyed your site, great job is this still your passion???

Top Voted
1 vote
+
Vote up!
-
Vote down!

Much Much better at room temp!! after freezing, the very cold does not do well for the flavors in my opinion ...

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