I've been experimenting with dehydrated breads and have finally found one that works well, for me anyway. When the bread is finished, it has a light brown/gold color with flecks of white (quinoa) and a slightly sweet taste.  

Recipe Directions

1. Add all ingredients to a food processor with an S blade process for about 1 minute. Thickness should be viscous but not watery. If it's too watery, add 1/2 tablespoon of Konsyl (psyllium fiber) and wait 3 to 5 minutes before transferring to the Teflex sheets.

2. Transfer the dough to two or more Teflex sheets as needed, keeping enough space between individual doughs. Maintain 1/2 inch to 1 inch thickness (1.2 to 2.5 centimeters). The bread is ideal when is dry and chewy on the outside and softer on the inside.

3. Keep dehydrator at 105 Fahrenheit for 8 hours (I wish I could give you optimal time in a dehydrator but it depends on the humidity in your house as well how thick the patty is).

4. Flip the buns and remove the Teflex sheets. Depending on humidity, another 8-16 hours in the dehydrator at 105 Fahrenheit until done.

Note:

I recommend designating one bun as a test bun to check on the degree of moisture inside. Always better to under-dry than over-dry.

Paul B's Thoughts

By Paul B

I've been experimenting with dehydrated breads and have finally found one that works well, for me anyway.

When the bread is finished, it has a light brown/gold color with flecks of white (quinoa) and a slightly sweet taste.

 

Print This Recipe (PDF)

Click the button below to download the printable PDF.

Comments

Top voted

2 votes
+
Vote up!
-
Vote down!

When you say "germinated quinoa", do you mean just soaked?

This sounds like a recipe I can work with and thanks for doing the footwork regarding overdrying. I always wondered why my breads had "rocks" in them!

Shari

2 votes
+
Vote up!
-
Vote down!

Shari,

In answer to your question regarding the quinoa, yes I just meant soaked. Quinoa sprouts much more quickly than kamut and therefore it's helpful if you add it later which complicates the recipe a little bit. But I like the white specks and protein it provides. Best.

Paul

2 votes
+
Vote up!
-
Vote down!

How do you eat this bread? What kind of Things do you pair with it?

All

2 votes
+
Vote up!
-
Vote down!

How do you eat this bread? What kind of Things do you pair with it?

Top Voted
2 votes
+
Vote up!
-
Vote down!

Shari,

In answer to your question regarding the quinoa, yes I just meant soaked. Quinoa sprouts much more quickly than kamut and therefore it's helpful if you add it later which complicates the recipe a little bit. But I like the white specks and protein it provides. Best.

Paul

Top Voted
2 votes
+
Vote up!
-
Vote down!

When you say "germinated quinoa", do you mean just soaked?

This sounds like a recipe I can work with and thanks for doing the footwork regarding overdrying. I always wondered why my breads had "rocks" in them!

Shari

Top Voted
2 votes
+
Vote up!
-
Vote down!

Mariposa,

I soaked the kamut for 8 hours and then sprouted it for another 24 (rinsing 2 or 3 times) making 36 hours in all. The length of the sprout was about 1/4 inch and looked like a little tail. Regarding the kamut getting to hard and crunchy in the dehydrator, I recommend getting a programmable timer to make certain you don't overdry the bread. I use a Westinghouse timer I bought at Lowe's. Make sure it's 3 prong so that you can connect to your dehydrator. Some dehydrators have timers built in. Many do not. But you have to experiment and control with the timing. Note: humidity in your house will affect drying time. The more humid, the longer the drying time.

I used about 6-8 hours before flipping the bread to give it time to cure/harden on the outside. After I flipped it, it took me between 8 to 16 more hours depending how moist and thick my dough was to start with and humidity in the house. I used a "test bun" to check on the bread. I like the outside dry and crisp with the inside soft and moist but not runny or sticky.

You might also make a little thicker bun to give you more margin for error. The thinner the bun, the easier to overdry. Best.

Paul

2 votes
+
Vote up!
-
Vote down!

I love kamut! its delicious. this sounds wonderful. how long did you soak it and allow it to sprout? I find that I have a hard time working with Kamut and wheatberries in dehydrated bread recipes because they get too hard/ crunchy in the dehydrator. But I keep trying!

Leave a Comment