I've been experimenting with dehydrated breads and have finally found one that works well, for me anyway. When the bread is finished, it has a light brown/gold color with flicks of white (quinoa) and a slightly sweet taste.

Recipe Directions

Add all ingredients to a food processor with an S blade process for about 1 minute. Thickness should be viscous but not watery. If it's too watery add 1/2 tablespoon of Konsyl (psyllium fiber) and wait 3 to 5 minutes before transfering to the teflex sheets.

Transfer the dough to two or more teflex sheets as needed keeping enough space between individual doughs. Maintain 1/2 inch to 1 inch thickness (1.2 to 2.5 cm). The bread is ideal when is dry and chewy on the outside and softer on the inside. I wish I could give you optimal time in a dehydrator but it depends on the humidity in your house as well how thick the patty is.

I maintained 105 degrees for 8 hours and flipped the buns removing the teflex sheets. Depending on humidity, another 8 to 16 hours at 105 until done. Recommend designating one bun as a test bun to check on the degree of moisture inside. always better to underdry than overdry.

Paul B's Thoughts

I've been experimenting with dehydrated breads and have finally found one that works well, for me anyway. When the bread is finished, it has a light brown/gold color with flicks of white (quinoa) and a slightly sweet taste.

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How do you eat this bread? What kind of Things do you pair with it?

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Shari,

In answer to your question regarding the quinoa, yes I just meant soaked. Quinoa sprouts much more quickly than kamut and therefore it's helpful if you add it later which complicates the recipe a little bit. But I like the white specks and protein it provides. Best.

Paul

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When you say "germinated quinoa", do you mean just soaked?

This sounds like a recipe I can work with and thanks for doing the footwork regarding overdrying. I always wondered why my breads had "rocks" in them!

Shari

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Mariposa,

I soaked the kamut for 8 hours and then sprouted it for another 24 (rinsing 2 or 3 times) making 36 hours in all. The length of the sprout was about 1/4 inch and looked like a little tail. Regarding the kamut getting to hard and crunchy in the dehydrator, I recommend getting a programmable timer to make certain you don't overdry the bread. I use a Westinghouse timer I bought at Lowe's. Make sure it's 3 prong so that you can connect to your dehydrator. Some dehydrators have timers built in. Many do not. But you have to experiment and control with the timing. Note: humidity in your house will affect drying time. The more humid, the longer the drying time.

I used about 6-8 hours before flipping the bread to give it time to cure/harden on the outside. After I flipped it, it took me between 8 to 16 more hours depending how moist and thick my dough was to start with and humidity in the house. I used a "test bun" to check on the bread. I like the outside dry and crisp with the inside soft and moist but not runny or sticky.

You might also make a little thicker bun to give you more margin for error. The thinner the bun, the easier to overdry. Best.

Paul

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I love kamut! its delicious. this sounds wonderful. how long did you soak it and allow it to sprout? I find that I have a hard time working with Kamut and wheatberries in dehydrated bread recipes because they get too hard/ crunchy in the dehydrator. But I keep trying!

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