Reminiscent of “real” olive-rosemary bread but pleasantly mild. I made this because I am always looking for new ways to use pulp left over from juicing but also because I craved a very simple, mild-tasting bread/cracker raw-edible, one that I could nibble by itself or make into a bruschetta, or eat with a dip,...

Recipe Directions

1. Soak pumpkin seeds for 6 hours. Process with enough filtered water to make it smooth. 2. Add in green pepper, pitted olives, and rosemary. 3. Add in vegetable pulp. 4. When the mixture is smooth from processing, spread thickly (my preference) onto dehydrator sheet. 5. Dehydrate for 24 hours, turning over once.

Za's Thoughts

By Za

Reminiscent of “real” olive-rosemary bread but pleasantly mild. I made this because I am always looking for new ways to use pulp left over from juicing but also because I craved a very simple, mild-tasting bread/cracker raw-edible, one that I could nibble by itself or make into a bruschetta, or eat with a dip, versatile without being bland. Since I used beet pulp, mine turned out a pretty terracotta color, which I find psychologically soothing…Try with any mild veggies. The green pepper lightens up the flavor a bit (the olives and pumpkins seeds make it heavier.)

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Olives ARE generally raw, they cure/soak in salt or brine. What you have to be aware of is what is in the brine. It could be raw ACV or it could be processed white vinegar. Also sometimes the canning process raises the heat too high. All the olives from Sunfood are raw, and you can pretty much count on salt-cured (Greek style) olives to be raw except they aren't necessarily made with good quality salt i.e. Celtic, Himalayan or Realsalt. If you want to make sure you are getting raw olives you can order them from Sunfood -- David Wolfe's site, or make your own!

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this sounds magnificent

i've been looking for a nice veggie 'bread' recipe

will likely use this as a guide and report back

thank you mmmmmm :)

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Are olives raw/ I don't have any technically raw sundried olives, and I wondered if the kalamata olives you find in jars at the store are raw/

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This looks great. I just got a juicer today so I'll be trying this soon!

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When I got this out of the dehydrator, there were already breaks, but all were big enough to be cracker-sized (next time, I'll try scoring first just to see the difference). The color is delightful and the crackers go really well with "raw hummus":http://www.therawtarian.com/community/recipe/hummus and tomato.

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Hmmm... I hope they're not too small! I've been experimenting with dehydrator-cracker textures lately... I've found that for this recipe, since I like it not to crumble when I do it up bruschetta-style, if I knead the batter first, either with my hands or with a spatula, I will get a much more resilient cracker. If once I spread it on the teflex sheet I "draw" a checker-board onto the batter with the edge of the spatula, then the batter will break into the regular squares that I've delineated in the dehydrator. That said, I think irregularly-shaped crackers are very nice too, as long as they're not too tiny! I'll try the recipe again, to make sure I gave the right proportions...

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I have this recipe in the dehydrator right now. I'm noticing that, as it dehydrates, breaks are happening (making small odd-shaped pieces). Is this normal?

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