Recipe Directions

Assemble as many pizzas as you want – layering sauce on the crust, then a bit of cheese (I like to flatten it in my hands in small pieces and lay it on the sauce) then the pepperoni.
Dehydrate at 105 degrees for at least 1/2 hour or until warm.

Poemomm's Thoughts

I had the most insane craving the other night – for a slice of pepperoni pizza. Weird, right? Especially considering I haven’t eaten a pork product in years… literally.
But what’s a girl to do? I had to have a slice, so I made one. If you get the craving, too, enjoy.
A hint: you can use either my Pizza Cheese recipe or my Real Cream Cheese recipe for the cheese. I personally found that the cultures in the Real Cream Cheese make this pizza taste guilt-inducing authentic… but I’ll let you decide which one you prefer.

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The real cream cheese was really good on my pizza - I never would have thought of it - thanks for the idea & recipe.

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haha yea it was my fault, since im german i thought you meant 100 degrees celcius :)

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Oh... and one more thing -- You'll have to convert my measurements to Imperial and my temp to Celsius to do the recipe right... yeppers, I'm one of those Yanks, alas.

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Jenny's absolutely right - you've got to distinguish between food temp and air temp. If you don't let the temp of the food hit above 40C (104-105F) you're well within range. Newbies tend to get this confused most often, and that's not necessarily a bad thing (if you've got a lower quality dehydrator it might indeed 'cook' the food, since lower quality ones tend to have hot spots).
My times and instructions are based off of the information I received from Dr. Cousens and the Excalibur dehydrating company, both sources which I trust.

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Poemomm-your recipes are outrageous! Every time you post I start drooling! Thank you so much for sharing your creations. I cannot wait until my juice feast is over!
Marcell: I think you're thinking degrees Celsius, right? 40 Celsius is 104 Fahrenheit. (I think most of us here are using Fahrenheit since the site is US-based.) Generally the rule is to keep interior temperature of food under 115F (46C). However, some say that it is fine (and preferable) when dehydrating items over a long period of time to start them out at 145F (63C) for the first hour or two. The reason for this is that the food will not reach the same temperature as the air in that time frame, but it will speed up the dehydrating and prevent fermentation. Hope this helps!

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found it.. never mind!

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where's the pepperoni recipe?

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Oh you're killing me!!! This sounds great!

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is it any good to dehydrate at over 100 degrees? Im pretty new to all this but iv allways read that it shouldnt go over 40 degrees, im just crious and wann learn more bout this stuff :)

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