Recipe Directions

In your blender, whir together mac nuts, almonds, water, 1 tsp of salt, and apple cider vinegar. This will take about 7-8 minutes. Whir until very smooth.
Add the rest of the almonds, 1/4 c at a time, waiting until they are finely ground and fully incorporated. I like my texture at about an additional cup of nuts.
Taste and add more salt, if desired.
Whir until smooth, with a very slightly grainy texture (It should NOT be gritty). You may want to finish this in your food processor, but I find my Cuisinart Blender is more than capable of doing the job.
You’ll be tempted to make your ricotta thicker – it should be the consistency of sour cream roughly – but don’t. This mimics the melting of real ricotta and allows other flavours to shine through in your recipes without the overkill of nut-flavour.

Poemomm's Thoughts

This ricotta recipe is a little different, in that it takes into account the desired consistency and taste of a SLIGHTLY WARMED raw italian dish.
Real Ricotta is made from whole milk, salt, and some form of acid (usually acv). I took these basic ingredients and formulated a ricotta cheese that will react well when put into things like cream sauces and casseroles. This ricotta is different in that it avoids cashews/sunflower seeds, lemons and nutritional yeast, which are all staples of generally accepted ‘rawcotta’ in our world. Instead I use macadamia nuts, which I’ve gound have the best dairy-effect, in conjunction with UNSOAKED almonds, for texture. ACV and sea salt finish the recipe.
While it is a very unorthodox method (there is no soaking or culturing), and while it may not be exactly what you find, texture-wise, in a container of dairy-ricotta, you’ll find that once assembled, the ricotta portion of your dish will be a pretty darn close clone of the cooked stuff. Creamy and divine. Use it as a base for cream sauces, as pictured in my Pasta Pepperoni (above), or in lasagna, etc.
Please make sure to follow the instructions carefully.

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Sweet Adeline's Review

Raw Ricotta
5
5 out of 5

bravo!

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I know I just commented, but I took a good look at the picture, that looks EXACTLY like cheese. I can't wait to try some of your recipes!!!!!

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This looks amazing and would go great over a salad!!!

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Wow! This tastes great. I can't handle cashews. Seems like they are in anything creamy. I shredded some daikon, carrot, zucchini, brocolli stem, sliced a scallion, chopped some broccoli crowns and a little bit of tomato. I put some of that sauce on it and topped it with tomatoes...so good. I was marinating/dehdrating bell pepper halves to stuff them...but this was soo good I couldn't wait. Yippe!

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I'm so excited to make this one. I've been wanting a way to make ricotta, but I don't eat cashews and my experiments have been... well let's not go there :) Thanks Poemomm!

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Having been taken in and raised by full blood Italians, this information will be very helpful. A few select vegetarian things have gotten through to them over the years. This might be one, and a point for the raw. I look forward to oogling your other recipes.

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LOL! Yeppers, we're on opposite sides... and hemispheres. Funny how the internet brings us all together...

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Funny to think you are at the other end of the world poemmomm...while I am culturing batch # 2 of yoghurt on my sink counter after a baking hot and strangely humid day in Western Australia it seems you are closed in by winter..but making a similar product.
Hope it turned out good!

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the cutlure will sustain itself for about 6 batches. After that IMO it seems to go funky. You can buy vegan probiotics where i live... depending on where you're at, this should be true for you, too.
Thanks for the compliments! I don't used my cultured method for the ricotta because the flavour is wrong for ricotta. Ricotta should be slightly sweet, while the cultured cream is definitively sour.
I've got a batch of your recipe of yoghurt culturing now... soooo excited! We work well together, methinks

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I think you are a truly clever raw 'cook' poemomm and want to make all your delicious recipes including this one.
....however I wonder why you have not modified your beautiful cultured cheese into a ricotta?
Also I am waiting on getting some more macadamias today to start a second batch of yoghurt (the original came from a spoonful of your cheese recipe). Have you tried this? Do you know if the the culture will sustain itself through batch after batch?

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