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Green vegetables high in calcium?

edited May 2014 in Being Raw

Hey everyone, Which green salad is highest in calcium and easy to digest, and how much of it would I need to eat raw, to reach 1000mg of calcium a day? I mainly eat fruit but I need to start eating alot of greens for calcium. Thanks!

Comments

  • swayzeswayze Raw Newbie
    edited June 12

    According to the World Health Organization, the average person really doesn't need that much calcium as long as animal protein and salt consumption are limited. It's very easy to meet calcium needs (450 mg/day, according to WHO) on a diet of fruit and greens.

    I talk more about this here:

    Are you getting enough calcium on raw foods?

    http://www.fitonraw.com/are-you-getting-enough-calcium-on-raw-foods/

    Swayze

     

  • Thanks Swayze Im eating dates, romaine letuce, celery, and herbs. You think those foods are good for calcium?

  • swayzeswayze Raw Newbie
    edited June 12

    It depends upon how much you're eating. Plug your intake into www.cronometer.com to see how much calcium you're getting.

    Swayze

     

  • hmm i had aboout 400 grams of dates in one sitting with romaine lettuce wrapped with them, also a bowl of grapes for breakfast. How much dates is too much . I buy organic bard valley dates. thanks Swayze:)

  • hmmm thanks for that website Swayze, its very helpful looks like I got 25% of calcium with about 16 dates

  • Hello Sweet,

    Check out nutritiondata.com for more information, but in my research, here are the top veggies for calcium:

    Ca per oz

    1. Lambsquarters 86 mg

    2. Dandelion 52 mg

    3. Basil 50 mg

    4. Arugula 45 mg

    If I remember correctly, kale and bok choy are not far behind.

    Also, please look into Kervran's theory of Biological Transmutation. I don't know if you are concerned about getting enough calcium for your bones, but many cultures around the world have high magnesium, low calcium diets (Asia, the Bantu people), and they do not suffer from osteoporosis to the degree the U.S. does. Magnesium, when combined with oxygen, can convert to calcium. Silica and potassium can also be converted over to calcium.

    One thing about the RDA is that for many nutrients the recommended is much higher than necessary. This is because the RDA is based on supplementation from synthetic nutrients. For example, the RDA for potassium is 3,500 mg, I believe. However, that is pretty high amount of potassium to consume in whole food form.

    Blessings,

    Andrew

  • powerliferpowerlifer Raw Newbie
    edited June 12

    I know its not a green vegetable but carrots are considered a very bioavailable source of calcium. Bioavailibility is a very important factor and can to some extent be more so than how much calcium a food contains.

     

  • It's true that magnesium is more effective than calcium. It helps the body absorb calcium better and flushes what the body can't use. Potassium also works great with magnesium and calcium. I worry more about magnesium and potassium intake than calcium because without the first two calcium isn't as effective.

  • According to the world Organizational Health 450mg/day is enough to sustain the needs of our body.

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