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CELERY 0%

edited December 2010 in Food Preparation

Okay I know a lot of people jumped on my case about the Garlic yes or no post, but here is another one. Has anyone heard anything negative about celery in general. Maybe being a hybrid or something to that effect. I just read this on wikipedia.com

There is a common belief that celery is so difficult for humans to digest, that it has ‘negative calories’ because human digestion burns more calories than can be extracted. Snopes2 believes this to be true, however at only 6 calories per stalk, the effect is negligible.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celery

What’s your thoughts ?

Comments

  • juice it

  • i love it, and from what i know wikipedia is (as usual) wrong and the reason there is a “negative calorie” effect is because it takes so long to chew, lol!

  • If you are eating solely for the caloric value then you may as well just eat Twinkies, Big Macs and Cokes!

    Celery is not eaten as a source of energy. Celery should be eaten because it is one of the best foods to keep the body well. It neutralizes acids and is a good blood cleanser. It has protective properties that are beneficial to both the brain and nervous system. Celery is an excellent food for people suffering from arthritis, neuritis, and rheumatism. Celery is high in natural sodium. Sodium keeps is young and active and the muscles limber and pliable. Sodium is one element that many people lack. Celery aids digestion, counteracts acidosis, halts fermentation, and purifies the bloodstream.

    Some people have difficulty breaking down the celulose/fibre in celery to efficiently digest it. To get around this, I regularly add 1 or 2 cups of celery to my smoothies. My Blendtec takes care of breaking down the cell walls and allows for easy digestion.

    Try this smoothie recipe to give you ample energy before an intense workout, or for recovery after it… -2 cups chopped celery -1 large banana -3 or 4 dates -2 cups purified water Blend and enjoy!

  • Celery is a nothing food to me!! It’s like fibrous water. The ‘strings’ always get stuck in my teeth, it is so snnoying. It is an obnoxious vegetable!

    For some reason I actually felt like some today! Weird.

  • The only time I eat celery is when I cook a chicken broth for flavoring. And that happens like, every 400 years? I don’t really eat raw food with celery in it.

    My take on celery is that it contains so many digestive juices and enzymes that it could cause a stomach ache, it helps in digestion, but it is really rough on the stomach. Kind of like when you eat pineapple… it’s teeming with enzymes. Really good for you, but since it could really cause a stomach ache because of it’s digestive juices, people could mistake it as bad for you. This is just my two cents, not what I think is necessarily true.

    But I am definately suspicious, I wouldn’t eat anything that there is even a remote chance of being bad for me..I’m glad I don’t eat it that much.

    Ooooooooooooh twinkies, I’ll come up with a raw version!! Few weeks, until I get my camera.

  • Celery is one of my favorite foods – ooooh the the juicy crunch! I love it with hummus or by itself. I sometimes chop it in bite-sized pieces and sit down to munch a bowl just like popcorn. I also like it as filler for salad dressings.

  • I love celery and almost always put a stalk in my green smoothies and it usually goes in my salad every day. As jgfergus wrote it’s loaded with all kinds of nutritious and beneficial properties.

  • I certainly don’t know anything that addresses your issue, but whenever I see those list of the most pesticide/herbacide-ridden foods, celery is always near the top of the list as not only having significant residue but also the number of chemical conconctions used on it. It is one of my “never buy unless it is organic” foods.

  • Celery is something that I have when I am at a cooked food Dinner or luncheon because someone brought a veggie tray. I don’t really go after the celery.

  • I agree with Dain5000, I don’t buy it unless it is organic, but I always try to find some organic cos I love it!

  • Celery in a smoothie = “Good Morning!” If you run marathons raw—you need the sodium/water celery provides or you become looooooopy!

  • Well I wouldn’t put it in my smoothies, isn’t it tastes like too salty for a smoothie? What do you combine them with, maybe have some recipes?

  • I have a sad celery story… I bought a big, lovely bunch of organic celery yesterday, got into it this morning when I was making my salad for lunch, and it’s all hollow inside! Nothing but strings on the outside and white stuff around a hollow core in each stalk. No juice. Bummer huh? Luckily my co-op has a return policy… but realistically, I’m lazy and it was only like a buck fifty, so it’s probably just compost. As a general thing, though, I really like celery. Especially with nut butter, or a mock deviled egg kind of dip.

  • I never thought it added anything but a clean taste to my smoothies, but it does have a taste vs. spinach which is tasteless in the smoothie. I usually add it as my green if I’m out of leaves or if I want to wake up and have amazing clarity. Basically berries, apple or pear and celery. Sometimes it’s mango or papaya, depending on what I’m trying to achieve.

  • I’ve been dehydrating celery, powdering it, and using it in place of sea salt in foods. It’s freaking awesome! What flavor!

  • Moth—you may have stumbled upon a miracle for the raw endurance athlete. We can pack that!

  • Celery: More Than Worth Its Salt PDF Print E-mail

    From Foodnsport.com

    Mention celery in any group of people and you will usually get very polarized responses. In general, most folks don’t have very strong feelings about carrots, lettuce, cucumbers, or other vegetables, but when it comes to celery, it seems they either love it or they just plain hate it. And their reasons are as varied as are the characteristics of this many-splendored veggie.

    Some cannot tolerate celery’s stringiness. Just something about that texture makes them uncomfortable. Other people like it, referring to the strings as “Nature’s floss.” Crunchy and juicy, salty yet sweet, celery is an enigma in the vegetable kingdom. Celery’s root is considered a delicacy, yet the leaves are toxic and bitter. Its “half-pipe” rib shape makes it perfect for dipping into spreads or filling with treats.

    Celery seems to go well with everything. People enjoy eating celery with nut or seed pat? as much as they enjoy it with berries, dates, blended with bananas, in salad, or as crudit?s. Celery boasts one of the lowest “calorie to bite” ratios of all foods, yet it is extremely satiating and nourishing. Celery travels exceptionally well. It stays fresh through an extended range of temperatures, withstands pressure changes admirably, and “lasts” quite nicely, even without refrigeration. Celery is more than just hardy, it’s almost supernatural. If the base of a celery “bunch” is put in water, not only will the celery stay fresh for weeks, it will actually resume growing.

    But celery has a lot more than just good looks going for it. Nutritionally, it is a powerhouse, rich in alkaline minerals. It is refreshingly juicy, yet exceptionally low in calories. Among terrestrial plants, celery is considered one of the best sources of sodium. It is high in fiber, rich in phytonutrients, and contains antioxidants and vitamins galore.

    Celery is exceptionally rehydrating, being high in both water and electrolytes. Thus, it is a wonderful food for those who are physically active. It supplies 18 different amino acids, including all eight of the essential amino acids, making it an exceptional source of complete protein. Though the outermost ribs of celery can be tough and even woody, the inner ribs are exceptionally soft, tender, and very easily chewed.

    Celery is truly a food worthy of much praise. In a world where green foods are touted as some of the most nutritious on the planet, celery scores extremely high marks. Be sure to include this versatile vegetable in many of your soup, salad, and dressing recipes.

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  • Blend organic celery and organic grapes with a little lemon for an incredible electrolyte drink. This was made for me by a couple of athletes who are bicycle marathoners and they swear by it.

    Celery dipped, in salads, in soups (good recipe on this site) and, of course, in green juices. It is a wonderfully versatile veggie.

    Think I'll go whip up a batch of hummus and dip some celery in it right now!

  • Celery dipping in hummus is amazing, its been one of my staple snacks.

    http://www.amlaberry.co.uk

  • I made some brazil nut cheese the other week, dipped some celery in it as an experiment, and it seriously gave my tongue an orgasm.

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