Recipe Directions

Ingredients


  • 1/2 pound almonds
  • 1/2 pound cashews
  • 4 cloves cardamom or cardamom powder (to taste)
  • 1 1/2 tbsp agave nectar
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • cacao powder (optional)



    Directions



    Using a food processor, grind down the almonds and cashews until they are as close to a powder as you can get them. Shell the cardamom cloves, and grind down the seeds to a fine powder using a mortar and pestle. In a large bowl, place the almond powder, cashew powder, cardamom powder, salt, and agave nectar. Mash everything together with your hands until all ingredients are evenly distributed and nothing is sticking to the bowl. Lay the mixture out on a large cutting board and flatten in down to about 1/2 inch thickness. Cut in whatever shape desired. (Optional) Roll individual pieces in cacao powder. Top each piece with whatever you’d like. I suggest cashews, almond, walnuts, pecans, dates, or bananas. Next…. oh wait, thats it. I forgot it was that simple.



    hehe… enjoy it!





    Copyright © 2008 Roshi’s Raw Lifestyle




RishiFromRoshis's Thoughts

Barfi (Indian sweet meats)

This weekend I went out to an Indian restaurant with my friends, and after eating dinner, a few them decided they were still up for a dessert. The restaurant had a big array of Indian sweet meats, and so I stood and explained to everyone what each one was. After everyone had finished scarfing down all the desserts, I realized that I could probably replicate them pretty well. There are many types of Indian sweat meats(ludoo, rusgula, gulab jamun), but out of all of them, my favorite is barfi. Barfi is traditionally made with boiled down milk, jaggery (home-made evaporate cane sugar), and ghee (clarified). Basically, this stuff is heavy, really heavy. If you can imagine what solidified poisonous deliciousness tastes like, that’s barfi. So now, with my barfi, you can enjoy all the wonderful flavors of barfi, with none of the common side effects (brick feeling in your stomach, immediate sleepiness, general malaise, etc.). Enjoy this one!

This recipe is from Roshi’s Raw Lifestyle. To see original posting click here .

Print This Recipe (PDF)

Click the button below to download the printable PDF.

Comments

Top voted

All

0 votes
+
Vote up!
-
Vote down!

"One pod yields 1/6 teaspoon cardamom. Substitutes: brown cardamom OR equal parts ground nutmeg and cinnamon OR equal parts ground cloves and cinnamon OR nutmeg OR cinnamon." I assume a pod is the same as a clove here. SOURCE: http://www.switcheroo.com/SpiceUniv.html

0 votes
+
Vote up!
-
Vote down!

I haven't yet, but maybe next week?

I kinda cook as the inspiration comes to me, so lemme sit on it for awhile and see what I can come up with.

Besides that, I'll be posting a new recipe within the next 2-3 days so keep an eye out for it. You can subscribe to the Roshi's email newsletter on roshis.com so you'll know immediately when its posted.

0 votes
+
Vote up!
-
Vote down!

Hi Roshi, my favorite cooked food used to be Indian food, I love your recipes. Have you ever tried making a raw Gulab Jamun recipe?

0 votes
+
Vote up!
-
Vote down!

SOOOO GOOD. one of your best yet.

0 votes
+
Vote up!
-
Vote down!

I love the trend of Indian desserts lately on this site. Indian sweets are one thing that I really miss from SAD eating. Most of all I loved the texture and the nuttiness.

0 votes
+
Vote up!
-
Vote down!

Hi stiffyk

Since cardamamom powders can very in strength greatly, I recommend just adding a little at a time until the taste is right. If you forced me to guess however, I would say just a bit less than 1/2 a teaspoon. Cardamom has a very strong flavor, so be careful not to add to much right off the bat. Mix and taste as you go.

Really hope you enjoy this one!

0 votes
+
Vote up!
-
Vote down!

About how much cardamom powder would you say equals four cloves?

Leave a Comment