Recipe Directions

1. Place zucchinis and apples into the food processor. Blend until absolutely pureed.

2. Add the salt, vanilla, cacao, and Sucanat. Process again for another 5 minutes or so. This will thicken at first and then thin considerably, once the Sucanat combines with the produce to release juices into the mixture.

3. Add the teff or sorghum flour and blend. This should be the consistency of real brownie batter-–like a thick sour cream.

4. Grease a 9×13 inch pan. Spread the mixture into the pan evenly.

5. Dehydrate at 145 Fahrenheit for 2 hours. Reduce the temperature to 105 Fahrenheit and dehydrate for another 6-8 hours. This will reduce the thickness of the mixture by about half and make the surface dry – the inside will still be sticky. 

6. Take a Teflex sheet and carefully flip the mixture out of the pan and onto the sheet. Carefully cut the brownies into bars of equal size. Separate enough to have space between each bar.

7. Dehydrate for another 3 to 5 hours or until dense and fudgy.

8. Carefully stack one bar on top of another (I stuck the sides that were on the Teflex sheet together), and gently press to seal the two halves together. This will make a brownie of ‘proper’ thickness. Garnish if desired.

Poemomm's Thoughts

By poemomm

These are the richest, most decadent brownies you will ever eat, and they’re completely appropriate for cooked food eaters! And they’re nut free (I put a walnut on the top for garnish in the photo).

Unlike most brownie recipes, which rely heavily on nuts and/or coconut oil for body, this recipe utilizes raw ivory teff flour or sorghum flour- super nutritious, gluten free, easily digestible grains. Teff and sorghum are available raw from Bob’s Red Mill. The nice side note to this is that these brownies do not have the bitter, slightly ‘off’ taste that I have found in most regular raw recipes.

It is really important to have high quality raw cacao powder. The first cacao I bought was overly fermented and tasted terrible. It almost put me off raw chocolate forever. I’ve switched to Nutiva brand, which I find gives consistently wonderful results.

There is some debate about sweeteners in the raw community. I've opted to use real, raw, evaporated cane juice in this recipe (and many of my new ones) in place of agave. Feel free to sub in agave or soaked Medjool dates, but be aware that the taste and texture will change, and you may need to add additional water.

To make nut brownies (my husband prefers brownies studded with walnuts), stir 1 cup of chopped walnuts into the brownie batter before dehydrating.

Follow the directions carefully to avoid fermentation and speed the process of making the brownies considerably.

This recipe may be stored and served at room temperature.

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Comments

Top voted

8 votes
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I'm not sure what happened, but mine ended up tasting too salty, too sweet, and too bitter. I used 1 fuji and 1 pinklady apple, so I'm assuming maybe the tartness of the pinklady is the cause? The texture is incredible, exactly like an undercooked, cooked brownie, however, they aren't that tasty and I wasted a lot of my cacao powder : /

7 votes
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Yes, they're really raw. Bob's Red Mill prides itself on stonegrinding the grains under low temperature conditions. They do not steam or heat any of their grains, except for oats. I've spoken with the company directly and have access to commercially privileged information which assures me that their status is truly raw. Other companies do not and cannot make this claim.

I'm not in any way affiliated with the company. Just a happy camper.

6 votes
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I've used one cup of cacao (all I had but couldn't wait to try the recipe!). It's in the dehydrator right now, but tasted chocolatey enough before it went it!

All

8 votes
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I'm not sure what happened, but mine ended up tasting too salty, too sweet, and too bitter. I used 1 fuji and 1 pinklady apple, so I'm assuming maybe the tartness of the pinklady is the cause? The texture is incredible, exactly like an undercooked, cooked brownie, however, they aren't that tasty and I wasted a lot of my cacao powder : /

Top Voted
4 votes
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Mmmm, mine were pulled out of the dehydrator last night. I had already feasted upon cantaloupe and grapes and was gonna have salad later, but brownies ended up being the rest of my meal.

I only had a bit of chocolate left, so I had to use half chocolate, half carob. I put in some raw honey that had crystalized. It wasn't dissolving too well, so I searched for another sweetener and found that I DID have sucanot in the back of the pantry so a mix of honey and sucanot.

When they were done, I drizzled a mixture of coconut oil, coconut buuter, cacao butter, and agave on the top and then sprinkled chopped walnuts on that which cemented in perfectly when it solidified.

So, everyone at work liked them except for one person. They didn't like the carob taste or the "graininess." Now several asked about the grittiness and I am not sure if its just a "wholefoods" thing or it was my crystalized honey which never completely dissolved. So another SAD eater test tonite when I take some over to a friends to watch the hockey game.

5 votes
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verytomato's Review

Double Fudge Brownies
5
5 out of 5

The best brownie recipe I've ever had. I used dates whipped up into a syrup (used about 20) and half sorghum/half teff. These are really good chopped up and sprinkled in strawberry-banana ice cream and probably any other banana ice cream.

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naomi! ive licked out the pan and am waiting not very patiently for them to be done, they have gone all day....thankyou, the batter is devine.......i used less cocoa and less salt to my tastes....xoxo you are amazing!

5 votes
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oh yummy!

4 votes
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I really love how you use a truly raw sweetener, no oil, nuts, or seeds. I hope to try teff and sorghum and see how I go with it. Thanks :)

4 votes
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Hi poemomm, this looks AMAZING. What could I use in place of teff? I cannot digest grains well and would love a substitute idea. Thanks and I will be making these soon :)

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so good, i tried half with spelt flour and it wasnt as good. i can't find nutiva cocoa. can you find a way to make raw m&m's? i suspect cooked white sugar could be made a crispy shell, or maybe agar agar mixed with something. i miss the way it would melt in my mouth and crunch up (but not in your hand)

4 votes
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I'm going to get some Zucchini today and then try this later tonight - but i am going to use Carob instead of Cacao (that's what i have an i cannot find true raw cacao powder - only nibs - where i live). This looks so great!!!

6 votes
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I've used one cup of cacao (all I had but couldn't wait to try the recipe!). It's in the dehydrator right now, but tasted chocolatey enough before it went it!

Top Voted
5 votes
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Has anyone tried this with less cacao? I have a limited amount for the next couple of weeks but I'd like to try this! Thanks...

4 votes
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I'd like to put in a request for old-fashioned corn bread...maybe using teff flour, corn and honey somehow?

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Can someone give me a link to Nutiva cacao? I can only find Navitas. Also can I use dark teff flour for this? Thanks for the awesome looking recipe!!

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When I finally get a dehydrator this might be the first receipe I try! They sound SO GOOD!

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Bob's Red Mill customer service also responded: "Our Teff flour is indeed Raw. I double checked with the manager in our lab here. Basically most of our products are considered raw except for our Oats, Almonds, and Almond meal flour. We do grind them from the raw grain into flour. Nothing is added or removed. Hopefully this info helps you. Thank you!"

7 votes
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Yes, they're really raw. Bob's Red Mill prides itself on stonegrinding the grains under low temperature conditions. They do not steam or heat any of their grains, except for oats. I've spoken with the company directly and have access to commercially privileged information which assures me that their status is truly raw. Other companies do not and cannot make this claim.

I'm not in any way affiliated with the company. Just a happy camper.

Top Voted
4 votes
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Are the teff and sorghum flours from Bob's Red Mill really raw? I thought all flours had some kind of heating process between crop and flour. I checked their website for each of the flours and couldn't find any mention of their process, whether it included steaming or other kind of heating before packaging. Does anyone know for sure before I order?

5 votes
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ooops. wrong recipe. LOL. You actually do need a dehydrator for this one.

4 votes
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you don't need a dehydrator - but it helps to make the gnocchi warm. You could also use the warm settiing on your oven

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I waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaant! but i dont have a dehydrator yet :(

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Thank you SOOOOOO MUCH for using teff. It's so nutritious and I was trying to find ways to use it. I found it delicious cooked, and now that I know it's alright to eat it raw w/o sprouting, will definetely be trying it!!

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Thanks poemom,I will definitely try to make my own flour. I'll be trying your recipe tommorrow. I think my dad will love it!

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*JoyceH* as far as I can tell, the brand Sucanot is raw as commonly defined inthe raw foods community . There's a big difference between what is commonly referred to as 'raw sugar' (processed with heat but retaining the molasses) and 'evaporated cane juice' (which is exactly what it states) -- and even then, there are some debates about what constitutes raw in our community. Then you add the whole carbon-footprint thing and....The key is to do what is most comfortable and workable FOR YOU!

Another note: It's important to remember that the raw/cooked debate involves enzymes and not some magical unknown factor. I look at sweeteners as I do spices - for mineral content and bionutrient value, as nutritional supplements or medicinal supplements, since most sweeteners (with the notable exception of fresh dates. Most spices fall into this category as well) are lacking in enzymes.

I prefer my macronutrients to contain enzymes, but I will eat those things which are demonstrably more nutritious if cooked -such as potatoes or legumes which contain anti-nutrients if eaten raw - in small quantities.

I use herbs fresh, and spices in their concentrated and dried forms, because these are the methods whereby the most health benefits are derived.

Sweeteners (I am not including fruits here) are grey-zone area - while valuable for concentrated calories (which many raw vegans may need because of the calorie restriction inherent in a fresh vegetable based diet), they are not - in a diet balanced by fruit and fat sources such as nuts - meant to be used as the bulk of the diet. Therefore I do not count them as a macronutrient. The ideal for those using them as a macronutrient (with enzymes intact) or philisophically committed to 100% enzyme-active food sources is to use dates (the fresher the better) or to concentrate a fruit such as pear as their source of sweetener. For a person with this conviction other sweeteners (Sucanot, agave nectar, yacon syrup) should not be considered appropriate.

It's important to understand the hard science behind our diet. There is a lot of misinformation and pseudo-science floating out there, but the best approach is to let truth - in the form of data - to be our guide as we journey through seeking and maintaining optimal physical health.

Hope this helps in making your determination!

Naomi

4 votes
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*ofek* Yes, my recipes are original! LOL. You can obtain information from The Teff Company or Bob's Red Mill about teff. For use in unbaked foods, I like to soak ground teff or sorghum, which allows for easier digestibility and increases the bioavailable nutrients. I'm sure you could sprout whole teff (it's very very tiny) or sorghum, but I'm not sure what protocol would be used and whether this would affect the outcome of the finished product.

*fender99* defatted almond flour is the residue left over from making homemade almond milk. I make my milk by straining until my water runs clear, and what is left over is largley fiber (the protein and fat are in the milk). I then dehydrate this and grind it to a powder. It works well anywhere a grain is called for.

*JoyceH* in place of sucanot you may use soaked medjool dates (I'm not a fan of date and cacao mixtures), agave nectar, or yakon syrup. You'll need to decrease the amount of apple and zuchinni a bit if using the syrups - and the dehydrating time will be longer.

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Wow! I do love Jennifer Cornbleet's walnut brownies. They taste authentic but a bit oily with the walnuts...

I'd like to eventually try this but I'm not a fan of sucanot and I'm under the impression it's not raw. Anything else we could use to substitute? If not, still might use the sucanot anyway..heck I'm not 100% raw anyway....

Hey Ofek - we are loving your real hummus recipe. It is the best hummus ever!! Even my very fussy eater of a husband loves it :-).....

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