Recipe Directions

Combine millet, oat flour, water, agave nectar, yeast, sea salt, optional sunflower seed butter, sesame seeds, and onion in your food processor. Whir until completely smooth. Put into a bowl and add the flaxmeal. Oil hands generously and divide dough into eight pieces. Flatten each piece into a disc and shape into a bagel (poke and enlarge a hole in the center of the disc).
Place on teflex sheet and let rest for an hour.
Dehydrate at 145 degrees for 2 hours, turn temp down to 115 degrees and dehydrate for another 3-4 hours.

Poemomm's Thoughts

This recipe combines Dr. Cousen’s methods for proper food preservation with basic food science, to create an authentic yeast bread that is safe, as well as a perfect foil for cream cheese or lox (see my other recipes).

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yeast basically adds flavor and air. If you don't mind a denser bagel, feel free to omit it

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carbon dioxide is composed of one part carbon and two parts oxygen and is not easily detected, as it is colorless, odorless and tasteless. for every 2,500 parts of atmospheric air, there is one part of carbon dioxide. when the air we breathe contains 3% carbon dioxide, a drowsy feeling occurs, and when it is present in larger quantities, death quickly results. if the organism does not promptly eliminate carbon dioxide, every cell becomes weakened and the entire body suffers. carbon dioxide gas is present in all charged drinks, in beer and fermented liquids, in baking powder cookery, in self-rising flour products, in yeast bread and in all fermenting products.
Purines are catabolized to uric acid in the body. Besides flesh foods, other foods that contain small amounts of purines are refined cereals, spaghetti and macaroni, sugars and sweets, tapioca, and YEAST.
IS the yeast truly essential t othis redipe? what purpose does it serve?
genuinely wanting to know!

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For those of you who have commented on the 145 degree temperature setting, I found some good information about why higher temperatures are ok at the beginning of dehydrating. I posted it on my blog. You can read it here:
http://www.healthy-woman.info/rawfoods/food-dehydrators/raw-food-enzymes...

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what is one packet of yeast in tablespoons or grams?????

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145 degrees? Isn't it too high? As far as I know the enzymes die above 118 degrees!

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In response to bellasera question, you can heat up at 145 in the dehydrator for 2 hours because it takes a long time for the temp to get that high, then after that lower it down to 105.

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I see here that some folks had some trouble with this. I had to improvise due to ingredients on hand and cuz thats just what I do and mine turned out great. Here's my tweaks: First, I subbed quinoa for the millet, which I sprouted. HAd no black seseme seeds so I used white. I did use the sunflower seed butter, which I made by combining the sunflower seeds with approx 2 TBLs of sunflower oil. I also misread the recipe at first and subsequently added about a TBLs of olive oil whilst processing. I did use the yeast, 1 packet. Yeast does not pose a problem for me, not yet anyways. Then I also added in about 2 Tbls dried oregano and couple dashes of hot sauce for extra flavor. After letting them rest I dehydrated for 8 hours at 120 degrees, then I split the bagels carefully and they were still moist, so I lowered the degree to 95 and dehydrated for about 10 more hours. They were a bit crumbly if you're rough with them but treated gingerly, they hold together well, the texture is satisfying, and the flavor mild but tasty. Oh, and I sprinkled poppy seeds on them before dehydrating. Thanks, poemomm!

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will some one please make these for me and Ill buy em and you ship em..they look DELICIOUS!! but I have NO TIME for the dehydrator and the soaking and the shopoing..and the excuses and more excuses...
:)

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i made these yesterday with my brand new dehydrator... i was excited to taste them! I tasted the raw dough and thought it was pretty good, but after dehydrating, i really don't like them anymore! ;( i don't really know why... they have a weird doughy taste. Maybe it's the taste of the yeast. i think i'll give them to my dogs instead... ;) i will try some of the bread recipes next.

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Heya..I'm just curious but don't we usually keep things below 105 degree's? Sounds good but that's what I read and have been taught. They look tasty though.

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I have heard from Kristensraw you can use nutrional yeast. They use it at Rawvolution too. I'd like to make these and I think I'll use Kamut like mandelicious. Let me know how they come out.

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sounds like a plan -- I'd even suggest splitting them at that point to 'toast' the centers.

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OK, they are hard on the outside and still very wet in the center... i think i should dehydrate more, but i'm scared of over dehydrating. i tasted a little of the dry edge, and they're really good! i did them overnight at a lower temp (just under 105) to preserve all enzymes, used kamut instead of millet, omitted yeast & sunflower seed butter, and added poppy seeds and more salt. they look, smell and taste amazing. i'm going to let them cool off, and if the centers don't dry out, i'll put them back in.

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i have kamut soaking... i'm making these (w/o yeast) when it sprouts. wish me luck!

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*kundalalita* Love the name, btw... you can blend whole flaxseeds (I always do). It takes patience. My guess is there could be a number of reasons the recipe didn't work out. A cooked ingredient will react differently, so you might be onto somethign with that. Also, the Bagels WILL feel moist when warm. As the bagel cools off, the moisture migrates from the center of the bagel. My guess is that you over dehydrated them. I did this with a batch and it definitely turned floury and crumbly.
*navski* I'm guessing it IS the sunflower seed butter. I happen to live in an area of the country where the winter heating systems make everything very dry, so the extra fat certainly helps here. You could omit the butter and see if it helps. Also you might need to blend it to a more smooth consistency.
To be honest with everyone, the second and third times I made this, I wasn't fabulously thrilled with it -- I'm planning on resubmitting a better bagel. Stay tuned (I've got to get some grains first).
Naomi

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Yea, it didn't really work out for me either :( ... i dont have a dehydrator, but i left it in the oven with the door open for like a day... i left it so long cuz i would check them and they would still be moist and finally i took them out and they were very hard after they cooled off... i decided to try it despite the very un-bagel-like texture.. and it tasted kinda funny...not spoiled but like dry and floury i guess... i dont know, i think its me too.. and to be honest my intuition says the ingredients i tried to get for it weren't raw....

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I tried making this, but it didn't work out - not sure what I did wrong. The taste seems not quite right & I had to dehydrate for about 15 hours after turning the temp down as they were very gooey on the inside. Could this be from the optional sunflower seed butter? I'm curious why it is optional. Or I wonder if I didn't make the batter quite smooth enough. I'd like to try again, any tips? They are not bad or anything, but your other recipes I've tried are so perfect on the texture and taste that I am sure it is me...

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Ah! the flaxseed meal is from Bob's Red Mill... will a blendtec grind whole flaxseeds instead?...and couldn't find raw black sesame seeds... this is a struggle! but its my mission for this week... working on another round of cream cheese lol

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hrm... well, if you can't find groats, then I'd check the labels (usually it will say if it's 'roasted for optimal flavour') and use the flour. You're making it into flour in the first place, right? I'd avoid the steel cut and flour of the lara's and Bob's Red Mill companies - I know they're both roasted. Worse comes to worse you can order oat groats online.

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Ok, at the store they have ground oats and they have oat flour... the ground up one is very chunky like flakes and the oat flour is fine, like well, flour...hard to say if either is raw... which one should be used?

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LOL! shiwa, no prob. I think people who are really concerned about the yeast should NOT use it - it might take away from the taste a bit, but being o nthe safe side is worth it, iMO.
Fresh yeast is definitely different :-) Never to old to learn. true so true!

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Well why are we all here, if not to learn and become better raw cooks and people?

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Dear poemomm, I really don't want to drag this out, I guess people who are sensitive to yeast will just have to take the risk or just not make it, but I've also frozen yeast doughs before baking and they rise just fine after thawing. but I usually use fresh not dry yeast. Maybe that makes a difference too. Seems I'm never too old to learn. :-))

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It probably would since malted barley is barley that's been sprouted and dried. LOL. But I'm gluten intolerant, so barley is a big 'no' for me.

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Well couldnt you use barley instead of millet? Since a traditional bagel I have seen use malted barley syrup. Wouldnt that give a somewhat similar flavor to it?

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