Recipe Directions

1. Blend everything, except the macadamia nuts, together.

2. Mix in macadamia nuts.

3. Form into a loaf and place in dehydrator for an hour on 140 F.

4. Slice into pieces and put back in for 4 and 8 hours at 120 F.

Writeeternity's Thoughts

By writeeternity

A decadent crispy cookie treat, but good for you!

I only dehydrated for 4 or 5 hours, and it was really good like brownies but harder would be like biscotti. Sprinkle with coconut for extra fun.

Mine tasted kind of like Oreos, so you could make a creme and sandwich between two pieces for a special treat.

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Comments

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Those look so yummy! And I adore that plate! Borage is one of my absolute favorite herbs.

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These look great, but I don't dehydrate over 105 due to the fact that it starts killing off the enzymes. I will try them at 105 and just leave them in the dehydrator longer see how that works since the recipe looks yummy.

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Hi Raw Earth! here is some info about borage if you were curious. I thought the sparks that come off of it was interesting!

---Constituents---Borage contains potassium and calcium, combined with mineral acids. The fresh juice affords 30 per cent, the dried herb 3 per cent of nitrate of potash. The stems and leaves supply much saline mucilage, which when boiled and cooked likewise deposits nitre and common salt. It is to these saline qualities that the wholesome invigorating properties of Borage are supposed to be due. Owing to the presence of nitrate of potash when burnt, it will emit sparks with a slight explosive sound.

---Medicinal Action and Uses---Diuretic, demulcent, emollient. Borage is much usedin France for fevers and pulmonary complaints. By virtue of its saline constituents, it promotes the activity of the kidneys and for this reason is employed to carry off feverish catarrhs. Its demulcent qualities are due to the mucilage contained in the whole plant.

For internal use, an infusion is made of 1 OZ of leaves to 1 pint of boiling water, taken in wineglassful doses.

Externally, it is employed as a poultice for inflammatory swellings.

---Preparation---Fluid extract. Dose, 1/2 to 1 drachm.

The flowers, candied and made into a conserve, were deemed useful for persons weakened by long sickness, and for those subject to swoonings; the distilled water was considered as effectual, and also valuable to cure inflammation of the eyes.

The juice in syrup was thought not only to be good in fevers, but to be a remedy for jaundice, itch and ringworm. Culpepper tells us that in his days: 'The dried herb is never used, but the green, yet the ashes thereof boiled in mead or honeyed water, is available in inflammation and ulcers in the mouth or throat, as a gargle.'

All

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Oooh, thanks writeeternity! Good stuff! :)

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Hi Raw Earth! here is some info about borage if you were curious. I thought the sparks that come off of it was interesting!

---Constituents---Borage contains potassium and calcium, combined with mineral acids. The fresh juice affords 30 per cent, the dried herb 3 per cent of nitrate of potash. The stems and leaves supply much saline mucilage, which when boiled and cooked likewise deposits nitre and common salt. It is to these saline qualities that the wholesome invigorating properties of Borage are supposed to be due. Owing to the presence of nitrate of potash when burnt, it will emit sparks with a slight explosive sound.

---Medicinal Action and Uses---Diuretic, demulcent, emollient. Borage is much usedin France for fevers and pulmonary complaints. By virtue of its saline constituents, it promotes the activity of the kidneys and for this reason is employed to carry off feverish catarrhs. Its demulcent qualities are due to the mucilage contained in the whole plant.

For internal use, an infusion is made of 1 OZ of leaves to 1 pint of boiling water, taken in wineglassful doses.

Externally, it is employed as a poultice for inflammatory swellings.

---Preparation---Fluid extract. Dose, 1/2 to 1 drachm.

The flowers, candied and made into a conserve, were deemed useful for persons weakened by long sickness, and for those subject to swoonings; the distilled water was considered as effectual, and also valuable to cure inflammation of the eyes.

The juice in syrup was thought not only to be good in fevers, but to be a remedy for jaundice, itch and ringworm. Culpepper tells us that in his days: 'The dried herb is never used, but the green, yet the ashes thereof boiled in mead or honeyed water, is available in inflammation and ulcers in the mouth or throat, as a gargle.'

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These look great, but I don't dehydrate over 105 due to the fact that it starts killing off the enzymes. I will try them at 105 and just leave them in the dehydrator longer see how that works since the recipe looks yummy.

Top Voted
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+
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Vote down!

Those look so yummy! And I adore that plate! Borage is one of my absolute favorite herbs.

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This looks indescribably delicious. I´ve been craving chocolate like crazy recently.

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oh yeah so on the list!!!

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