Recipe Directions

Roughly cut the spiralized noodles (I run the pile through with a knife in several directions).

On your teflex sheet, lay the spiralized noodles down (you want these to be linguini thickness, since they shrink considerably when dehydrated).

Layer on the carrots and celery. You want to make these as thin as possible – so that you can see through them. You can also freeze these first. Freezing will help break down the cell walls and produces a more tender soup veggie. I don’t – I just slice them ultra thin.

Sprinkle the onion over the top and dehydrate at 105 degrees for at least 12 hours, or until very crisp.

The next day over very low heat, gently heat the water, turmeric, salt, bay leaf, pepper, and parsley in a small saucepan. Allow to steep for 5 minutes or so, to allow the flavors to blend.

Add the dehydrated veggies – you can crumble them into the pan – and allow to steep until the ‘noodles’ are soft, and the veggies have rehydrated. This is according to preference, but I let the soup steep for about 5-10 minutes. The longer the soup sits, the softer the noodles will get.

Serve or pour into a thermos and take with you!

Poemomm's Thoughts

This recipe was created, at the request of Medidating, who is looking for more soups for winter time. This recipe is meant to replicate the taste and texture of the Lipton Cup of Noodle soup (chicken flavor) that I loved as a kid…. Anyone else remember those packets??

You’ll need to start this recipe the night before in order to dehydrate the soup ingredients, particularly the noodles. This is absolutely essential in order for the recipe to work.

Spices, which do not contain enzymes and whose health properties increase substantially when ground or processed, should be treated like food supplements or medicines. I recommend using the spices I list rather than trying to use ‘really raw’ spices like tumeric– if you must, please reduce the amount considerably.

Enjoy!

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I have this all ready for dinner tonight, I can't wait! I have tons of other things going on in my dehydrator today, so I'll heat the water/spices on the stove. But I like the idea of leaving it in the dehydrator all day, thanks rawlady!

peomom, I have a ton of your recipes going today, you are the best!

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I do remember those little soup packets! "Is it soup yet?" It was a favorite in our house! Thanks for the recipe and I look forward to trying it.

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THANK YOU! I can't wait to try this.

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I don't really have access to a stove, so I heated the "broth" at the same time as I dehydrated the veges ... used a bowl with a fairly tight fitting lid and slid it and the veges into the dehydrator this morning before I left for work. This evening, I simply added the veges to the already warmed broth, let it set for 10-15 mins, and enjoyed a nice bowl of delicious soup. The broth was great. Next time I'm adding dehydrated mushrooms and a few chunks of tomato. Thanks for the great recipe!

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I have noticed that when I heat in a kettle that the middle may be just right but the bottom of the pan makes the liquid above the right temperature.So now I put the kettle over a simmer burner, and stir constantly. I also still use a thermometer and take off just before it hits the temp. I want.

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Thank you for the advice on spices

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*therawdance* You'll have to let me know how it goes. The combination of the spices and turmeric taste like bouillion - I'd be interested to hear how the 'fresh/cold' version tastes.

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*RCBALive* gently heat= heat until just about 110 degrees. This is baby bottle warm (warm to the wrist). Those who are not used to temperatures may want to use a thermometer until they get the hang of it. I find that most raw newbies underheat their liquids (for fear of overheating) and often (sadly) many long time rawbies who do not do this often actually overheat theirs...

I heat liquids to this temperature a lot, in my regular professional life (baking), so I know by 'feel' the correct temperature.

When in doubt, quantify!!!

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Wow, now that is a lengthy process but the outcome is beautiful!!! Thank you for sharing. I might try it sometime minus the dehydrating and low heat - not my thing. You seriously got it to resemble the real deal, brilliant job. Ps. I love that you used bay leaf! creative!

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I am so making this:)

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Your picture is beautiful and the recipe sounds delicious. I would like you to clarify what"gently heat" means. Is it still raw? You are so creative. Thanks!

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yum! thanks for this recipe

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Wow, that looks great!

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