Recipe Directions

1) Pulse the jicama in a food processor until it has a couscous texture. Scoop it out into a fine mesh colander and rinse briefly under cold water to get out some of the starchiness. Then dump it onto a clean towel or paper towels and dry as best you can.Place in a big enough bowl.

2)Process the pine nuts. (RFRW instructs using a food processor) I used my coffee/spice grinder. I processed until it was finely chopped and a bit wet and mushy. Then mix it together with the jicama. Add the almond oil and the sea salt. Next chop up the tomato into small cubes and mix into the couscous.

3)Place one handful of arugula on each plate. Add one tablespoon of almond oil to each plate of arugula. Season with salt and pepper. Scoop the couscous onto each plate on top of the arugula. Serve and enjoy!

JoyceH's Thoughts

By JoyceH

This is inspired from Raw Food Real World’s couscous recipe. They use currants while I used tomatoes and added my own variations. It’s a nice summery recipe that is very filling and tasty. My picky husband really enjoyed this dinner and kept saying how much he liked it. I think the tomatoes and unique flavor of the almond oil made it lovely.

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Hi evergreen, glad you enjoyed it! I look forward to making it again the next time I buy a jicama

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hello,again...i just made this for lunch,and enjoyed it so much...i noticed the sweet almond oil i use as a moisturizer says it is food grade,and can be used as a salad or culinary oil! thanks for the store info,and thanks for a great recipe:)

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Hi evergreen - you could use califlower as well but it might not be as mild as the jicama. You can get jicama (not organic) at City Market co-op on Winooski Ave as well as the almond oil. I can't remember the name off hand but it's with all the diffent kinds of oil. They moved things around so I forget what ailse it's in now. I got my jicama at the little Asian Market on North Street. (Thai Phat)

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hi!..this looks yummy,how do you think cauliflower would work for an alternative? is there a name on the almond oil or is it bulk?(is co-op the one on Winooski Ave?:) )

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daikon is way to strong! an crisp bosc pear would be mor inline with a jicama...

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Sounds like daikon then, I've seen that but never used it.

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I don't know if a yam potato would work as a sub because I think yam has a much stronger taste then jicama but it would probally still taste pretty good.

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I normally see Jicama in the conventional produce section and never sold as organic. I guess that's why I hadn't tried one until now. I hadn't even heard of them either until turning raw and seeing them in the odd recipe now and then. I wonder if celery root or daikon would be similar. I haven't tried either one of those veggies but I've seen them in rice recipes. Doesn't Cafe Gratitude have a rice recipe using celery root. (too lazy to go check) Anyway there are probably a few substitutes out there for jicama. Anyone know which ones are the best?

Sweetpea - I've never used a yam potato in a raw recipe so I don't know. Anyone else know?

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Thank you! Would a yam potato be a close alternative?

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jicama is a sweet, crisp, watery root veggie that is native to mexico (hence more popular in USA probably). i hear it is also called a "yam bean."

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Hi, here in the UK, I've never come across jicama and don't know what it is. What is it and what could be a substitute for it? Thanks

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PS - I purchased my almond oil for around $6 at City Market Co-op and have seen it in our other co-ops and healthy stores. So it's not hard to find! It is probably not raw but the taste is worth it. You can try other truly raw oils but the couscous will take on a completely different taste from this mixture. The almond oil is very light, mild and rather sweet tasting. Truly lovely!

Using Jicama offers many possibilities for raw couscous recipes since it is so mild and neutral tasting. This was my first experience with Jicama. I saw it in the local Asian Market this week and had to try one.

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