Recipe Directions

  • 1. Mix everything together in a mixing bowl.
  • 2. Line two dehydrator trays with parchment paper or teflex sheets. Spread batter evenly on two trays using the back of a spoon.

  • 3. Start dehydrating the crackers. I generally dehydrate everything at 120 degrees for the first hour, then I reduce the temperature to 105 degrees for the remainder of the cooking time.
  • 4. Score the crackers. Once the crackers are starting to harden up (four hours later?), use a knife to score the crackers along wherever you want the crackers to separate. (This will make them easier to break later on.)
  • 5. Remove paper or teflex. Once the crackers are holding their shape together very well (8 hours in the dehydrator?), break them apart along the score lines. Remove the parchment or teflex sheets and place the crackers directly on the dehydrator tray.
  • 6. Finish dehydrating. Some people like their crackers a bit moist. I like this particular recipe to be very dry. If you plan on keeping them for a few weeks or more in storage, then you must ensure that there is no moisture left.

The Rawtarian's Thoughts

By The Rawtarian

Having a basic raw cracker recipe at your disposal is integral. Make sure to always have a batch of basic raw crackers on hand at all times. Crackers are very helpful when you need to throw together a quick raw meal or snack. Raw crackers are integral to helping you keep with the raw food diet lifestyle.

Here is my standby basic raw cracker recipe, which I use on a regular basis. Feel free to modify to suit your fancy. For example, you could make a sweeter cracker by omitting the savoury spices and adding cinnamon, for example.

This recipe makes enough for two dehydrator trays' worth of raw crackers. Try it as is once to make sure that you'll like it. Then, forever more, double or triple the recipe! Buy parchment paper or teflex sheets (which can be purchased from dehydrator sellers). 

I store dehydrated crackers in the freezer in a large ziploc bag.

Eat and enjoy! I love avocado, sprouts, and tomato on raw crackers. Mmm!

Recipe Photos

Nutrition Facts

Nutritional score: 77 out of 100
  • This recipe is very low in Carbohydrates, and Sodium.
  • This recipe is a good source of Protein, Dietary Fiber, Iron, Vitamin B6, and Vitamin E.
  • This recipe is a noteworthy source of Calcium.

Amounts per 89 g (3 oz) suggested serving

NameAmount% Daily
Calories 239 10 %
Protein 8 g 15 %
Fat 20 g 25 %
Carbohydrates 11 g 3 %
Dietary Fiber 8 g 26 %
Sugars 0.74 g
Calcium 126 mg 13 %
Iron 2.9 mg 22 %
Sodium 177 mg 8 %
Source: The Rawtarian, USDA

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Comments and Reviews

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26 votes
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Hey Matt, loved your email and pic! Glad they turned out well for you.

32 votes
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I had a simple dehydrator years ago and have finally decided to get back into it. Basically, I did banana chips and jerky. The raw foods way, while interesting and I certainly do not disrespect it, is not a limiting factor for me. I have purchased another simple dehydrator and it doesn't have a variable temperature, so I don't know what temp it runs. (Nesco 400 watt round model) This cracker recipe looks really interesting! Am I going to be able to pull it off with my basic dehydrator? I appreciate one of your other reader's comments involving substitutions...my wife is allergic to sesame, so I'm going to try to find chia seeds. If that doesn't happen, then maybe pumpkin seeds (should I give them a quick buzz in the processor?). I've never used flax before...looks kind of like sesame, but I don't think they are related. Ever heard of flax allergies? If not, I think we're good. Happy dehydrating!

58 votes
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Matt, I'm a professional herbalist, I've been studying plants since 1977. Sesame is not at all related to either Flax seed or Chia seed. Sesame is in the Pedaliaceae Family, Flax is in the Linaceae Family (fibre from the plant is used to make linen cloth) , Chia is in the Lamiaceae Family (That's the Mint Family...).

23 votes
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Hello, there.
I have a question.
I do not feel comfortable to leave the dehydrator working over night. Is it possible to run it 10 hrs a day, then switch it off and then run it for 10 hours again?
Thank you

26 votes
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Hi Alina,

It's possible but you want to be careful of food spoilage - things might go bad (moldy, etc) if you keep heating and cooling too many times. It may be best to refrigerate in between dehydrating times.

Definitely better to do it all at once though :)

21 votes
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Thank you. Just newbie's fears )))

26 votes
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You're just doing your "due diligence" Alina. I like that!

24 votes
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Do you need a dehydrator to make these or could you do them in an oven???

19 votes
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Dehydrator definitely needed, Sheila :)

22 votes
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I just got a newfood dehydrator and this post is a quiet the inspiration I needed, thank you!:)

25 votes
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Congrats on your new dehydrator, Jelane! Glad to provide some inspiration for ya!

24 votes
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Hi, I am new to raw, so have a question about sprouting: I seem to see sprouted seeds in a lot of the packaged raw products. What is the advantage to sprouting first, and is soaking as you mentioned in a previous response above, enough to consider the seeds sprouted, or do you actually see the beginning of growth before it's actually sprouted?

28 votes
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Sprouting is good because it involves removing the enzyme inhibitors (the stuff that makes the food be dormant and not grow when dry) so they start growing - thus they have more enzymes and are alive!

However, sprouting is really annoying and time-consuming, so I don't usually do it.

However, sometimes in my recipes I will tell you to SOAK something and that is important because in some recipes food needs to be softened by soaking

Hope that helps, Karen!

21 votes
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I'm not sure where I'm going with my eating I hate alot friuts and veggies. I don't like most cooked, maybe raw would be better?

24 votes
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You probably need to acquire a taste for them. I also used to hate the taste of raw fruit and veg before I did a 30-day raw food challenge. Watch me talk about it here: http://www.therawtarian.com/rawtarians-story

28 votes
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Hi, I'm new to raw foods and there is one thing I don't understand about your recipe. If any temp. above 115 degrees kills enzymes, why do we start the crackers at 120 degrees for the first hour? I don't understand how that doesn't kill the enzymes. I have seen this in other recipes, as well. Thanks for any info.

21 votes
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Hi Marsha, I explain this more in Raw Dehydrating 101, but basically -

As you know, when dehydrating raw food it is important to keep the enzymes alive by dehydrating at 105 degrees Fahrenheit (40.6 degrees Celsius) or lower.
However, I recommend turning your dehydrator on “high” for about 1.5 hours when first putting food in the dehydrator, and then decreasing the temperature to 105 degrees after 1.5 hours or so.

I suggest this because the initial warmer temperature will help to take away a lot of the moisture at first, and the thinking is that it takes a while for your dehydrator to climb up to “high” and it also takes quite a while for the food to actually get to the temperature that the dehydrator air is at. *******************

One of the best side-effects of setting your temperature higher at first is that itʼs good at getting rid of the initial moisture quite quickly. Increasing the temperature at the beginning of cooking time is common practice in the raw food community. If you are not mindful about turning the heat back down, yes, it is possible that your food will go above 105 degrees. However, I feel that this risk is warranted. That initial heat blast can really save you a lot of time and can accelerate the dehydrating process by quite a bit, even by 50% sometimes.

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For me, I do strive to live a 100% raw lifestyle; however, I also make some slight tweaks to the “rules” in order to ensure that I can stay raw over the long-term.

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This slight temperature increase is a rule-bender that many, many raw fooders do, and it is worth it.

25 votes
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Thank you so much for your reply :)

24 votes
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:)

22 votes
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Ok! I made the crackers and they finished yesterday!!! Amazing! Even my adult sons who are not rawtarians loved them! I made some sweet and some savory- by sweet I mean I added coconut and blueberries after everything else and before any savory spices. Today I made your raw zucchini bread! Can't wait for that! Your recipes are wonderful! Thanks again for all you do!
Carrie

24 votes
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Yum! Nice substitutions! Glad you are putting your new D through some hoops. Soo nice to have a D - there is nothing like a crunchy cracker when you haven't had one in ages! Texture is important

26 votes
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I just got my dehydrator and I am initiating it with your raw cracker recipe! I'm SO grateful that you are there, doing what you do! I'm a big fan, and I know there are lots of us out here who appreciate you!
Thanks,
Carrie

23 votes
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xox

22 votes
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Can I dry these in My Oven ,It only goes down to 140 but I have been dehidrating fruit and making roll ups , it seems to work well.

25 votes
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Linda, any foods you are drying in your oven at that temperature will heat to the point of cooking the food. It will heat the food to the point of destroying the bioactivity of the food. That goes for these crackers as well as the fruit you have been drying, which may have dried and tasted yummy but is not raw.

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