Recipe Directions

  • 1. Add all ingredients to food processor. Process well, until quite well blended but still chunky. 40 seconds or so.
  • 2. Spread onto two dehydrator sheets. Use parchment paper or Teflex sheets. (For the love of God, never use waxed paper!)
  • 3. Dehydrate for 1 hour at 115. After one hour score the crackers with a knife so that they’ll be easier to separate later. Dehydrate for another 6 hours at 105. After 6 hours flip crackers and remove parchment paper or Teflex sheets. Dehydrate for one more hour at 105 until dry and cracker-like!

The Rawtarian's Thoughts

By The Rawtarian

Raw flax cracker recipes... Yeah, I know, there are a zillion of recipes for raw flax dehydrator crackers online. But how many of them are actually really good standby recipes that you want to make again and again? For me, this is my favorite raw flax cracker recipe -- hands down.

What makes this recipe special? As always, I like how there aren't very many ingredients in it. But somehow, I think because of the walnuts, these crackers have a very nice, hearty, satisfying weight to them.

I like to eat one or two of these crackers when I'm feeling as though I need a raw flax cracker recipe that'll really fill me up... and that tastes great, too.

Do not use a high-speed blender for this recipe. A food processor will work much better. Dehydrating times can vary wildly depending on the season, the humidity and your dehydrator. The best thing to do is hang out at home and check on them every couple of hours until you get the hang of making crackers. Try not to nibble too much on these raw flax crackers before they're done!

Note: If you don't have a tomato, you can use an apple + 1/4 cup water instead of the tomato.

Recipe Photos

Nutrition Facts

Nutritional score: 77 out of 100
  • This recipe is very low in Carbohydrates.
  • This recipe is low in Calories, and Sodium.
  • This recipe is an excellent source of Vitamin E.
  • This recipe is a good source of Protein, Riboflavin, and Vitamin B6.
  • This recipe is a noteworthy source of Dietary Fiber, and Iron.

Amounts per 65 g (2 oz) suggested serving

NameAmount% Daily
Calories 264 11 %
Protein 8 g 15 %
Fat 23 g 29 %
Carbohydrates 10 g 3 %
Dietary Fiber 5 g 14 %
Sugars 2.1 g
Calcium 71 mg 7 %
Iron 1.8 mg 14 %
Sodium 354 mg 15 %
Source: USDA, The Rawtarian

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Comments and Reviews

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24 votes
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This recipe isn't the easiest to spread, I will admit.

Cracker recipes that contain oil (olive oil, for example) are easier to spread, but they don't get as crisp.

To spread this recipe just takes patience. I usually use the back of a spoon to spread this recipe on parchment paper.

If they are really crumbly they might be a bit too dry - you could try adding a VERY small amount of water if they won't spread (small amount = 1 teaspoon for example)

25 votes
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hi! i just got a dehydrator and these were my first attempt at flax crackers.. they taste absolutely delicious! my only question is: I left them dehydrating for a very long time (over night and then some) because they didn't seem to get totally dry ever... do you know why this could be? is it a matter of thickness?

24 votes
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This cracker gets crisp and cracker like, but not bone dry

Thickness definitely affects this - so next time you could try to make thinner - especially in the center. And also if you seperate them once they are holding together and then dehydrate for the longest time while they are cut up like crackers that will help the air ciculate around them

26 votes
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Hi Laura,
I just wondered if you took the skin off the almonds or left it? I think I read somewhere that the skin contains something that prevents absorption of other good stuff (I think it was called phytic acid, but might be mixing the name up with something else).
I love your site and your recipes are wonderful! I'm going to try the 'cheesecake' as well as the flax crackers - can't WAIT!
Jeni x

21 votes
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You should soak the almonds in salt water overnight to remove the phytic acid first and then make the crackers. You could either make the crackers with the almonds still wet or what I usually do is immediately dehydrate the plain almonds and have them on hand for recipes like this. Nurishing Traditions is a good book that goes over all the soaking.

22 votes
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I never remove the almond skins because that just sounds like way too much work!!!

22 votes
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These sound great and in keeping with my A type diet its great, apart from the tomato. If I leave this out and/use a chili, will it affect the cracker much?

23 votes
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If not using the tomato you will need to add a tiny bit of liquid (water?) or something tomato-like so that the balance doesn't get all wonky

19 votes
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Would you change flavors at all to make crackers that would be good with almond butter/honey. My kids would eat this.

22 votes
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oh, I've looked around your site at more recipes, and I think I got it. I will try some!

20 votes
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Hi there! I'm going to make these this weekend, but I was curious-is it whole flaxseed or ground flaxseed? I'm guessing you would have said 'ground', if it was. :) Thank you!! Loving all your easy-to-make & not-expensive-ingredient recipes!!

171 votes
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It won't make much difference for taste, but be sure to grind flaxseed in order to get all that fiber, omega-3 fatty acids, and lignans! Most whole flaxseed passes through your system undigested, making them a little pointless. See, e.g., http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/flaxseed/AN01258

152 votes
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Great tip, Amber! Thank you for sharing

20 votes
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either would be fine, but I usually use whole in this recipe :)

48 votes
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Do you soak your sunflower and flax seeds first?

52 votes
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Hi Betty! Nope, no soaking 'round these parts unless it's specifically stated :)

20 votes
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I made these last week as my first-ever raw chips. Wonderful flavor and easy to make. I was out of almonds, so doubled the walnuts. Shared them at work and everyone loved them. Thank you!

22 votes
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Brenda, you are superwoman and an excellent sharer lol.

Glad to read what you susbtituted with and how they turned out. Thanks for being here.

25 votes
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Could you make these in the oven over a period of time? I don`t have a dehydrator.

18 votes
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No, sorry. You need a dehydrator. Oven won't do.

21 votes
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Some convection ovens can be set to 105 degrees and work fine.

23 votes
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Thanks so much for posting this; I'm excited to try it. We're new to raw food, and the info you've provided is awesome!

Can you make these with any type of nut? I have a slight reaction to walnuts - weird, I know. Do you think pecans would work as well? Or something similar?

19 votes
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Yes, you could definitely substitute pecans for the walnuts :)

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I made these crackers today and they're yummy!! I added some caraway and they were just perfect! Easy to make and delicious. The flavors of tomato, onion, and salt make a delicious cracker for guacamole, raw hummus, or even as a bun for sunflower seed burgers. Thanks!

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