Recipe Directions

  • 1. Get out a large mixing bowl. Place raisins, pecans and sesame seeds in bowl. Set aside for later.
  • 2. Place water, peeled bananas, vanilla, cinnamon and sea salt into your high speed blender. Once blending, add chopped carrots and dates. Mixture will be pretty thick. Try to avoid adding any extra water (besides the initial quarter cup). Blend until nicely combined and smooth, like a smoothie.
  • 3. Try to do this step quickly: Add chia seeds to blender mixture and blend well. Since the mixture is already quite thick, your chia seeds might get stuck at the top of the mixture. If so, turn blender off and create an air pocket down the side of the mixture. Also, use your Vitamix tamper (big tool for mixing, like a big spoon) if you have one. Start blender on low again and increase speed. (Remember that chia seeds will thicken the mixture even more so work fast!)
  • 3. Once your mixture seems as smooth as you can get it, find the mixing bowl that you set aside in step 1. Now, pour/spoon blender mixture on top of rasins, pecans and sesame seeds. Mix with a spoon. This should now resemble regular, Standard American Diet (SAD) banana bread batter.
  • 4. Line two dehydrator trays with parchment paper or teflex sheets. (Do not use wax paper! It'll stick and be a disaster!)
  • 5. Pour half of raw banana bread batter onto each tray. Smooth batter out with the back of a spoon (or with a palette knife/cracker spreader). Batter should be a 1/4 of an inch thick or a bit less. The thinner the batter is the better it will dehydrate, although you don't want it too thin because you want some moistness in the middle like "raw banana bread slices" not like dried out "banana crackers or cookies" if you know what I mean!
  • 6. Dehydrate on high for 1.5 hours. Reduce temperature to 105 degrees and dehydrate your banana bread for another couple of hours. Once it seems to be holding together and drying out, score lines into the crackers with a knife so that you can more easily break them up later.
  • 7. Keep dehydrating. At some point once they appear to be holding together very well you’ll want to remove the parchment paper, flip them over and finish dehydrating them. (You want to remove the parchment paper so that the air can flow around better without being blocked by the parchment paper.)
  • 8. One you've flipped over your banana bread slices, keep monitoring based on how dry/moist you want your banana bread slices to be. Dehydrator times and temperatures can vary greatly so I urge you to check this raw banana bread recipe quite frequently. Don't be afraid to taste test, especially if you are new to dehydrating.
  • 9. Once your banana bread is done, remove from dehydrator. Eat some right away, and let the others cool. If you want some extra excitement for your banana bread, you can top it with a cream-cheese like spread made from cashews. Enjoy this raw banana bread recipe!

The Rawtarian's Thoughts

By The Rawtarian

Raw banana bread recipes are comfort food for me. I was raised on banana bread, carrot cake and zucchini bread, and I love all those tastes. So I've been enjoying recreating my favorite childhood flavors, starting with this raw banana bread recipe.

This is basically an easy raw banana bread recipe in terms of procedure--just blend everything together, add the "mix-ins" (raisins, etc) and then dehydrate. However, timing is very important because this raw banana bread blender mixture is pretty thick, and when you add the chia seeds the mixture will thicken even more, so you have to work fast to make this work. Don't be intimidated, it's very easy. You just have to be aware that you need to work a bit faster than normal when making this raw banana bread recipe, for example, have all your ingredients out on the counter and don't clean up until everything is in the dehydrator.

You can certainly serve this banana bread recipe on its own, or topped with almond butter or honey, or even topped with a delicious raw white icing that resembles cream cheese icing.

Recipe Photos

Nutrition Facts

Nutritional score: 95 out of 100
  • This recipe is very low in Calories, Fat, Carbohydrates, and Sodium.
  • This recipe is a good source of Vitamin B6.
  • This recipe is a noteworthy source of Protein, Dietary Fiber, Iron, and Vitamin A.

Amounts per 105 g (4 oz) suggested serving

NameAmount% Daily
Calories 169 7 %
Protein 3 g 6 %
Fat 6 g 7 %
Carbohydrates 29 g 9 %
Dietary Fiber 5 g 16 %
Sugars 16 g
Calcium 80 mg 8 %
Iron 1.4 mg 10 %
Sodium 23 mg 1 %
Source: USDA, The Rawtarian

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Comments and Reviews

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36 votes
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Strange - I find chia seeds to have a bland flavor. Also, I don't recall a smokey taste.

Did you use nicely ripe bananas?

26 votes
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Hi Laura Jane and thanks for what your doing for us with your website. Since I'm going to make some banana bread today and probably some onion bread tomorrow, I was wondering how long I could keep them. I did onion bread before and stored it in a metal box but I didn't really know how long i could keep it that way.
I would also ask if I could put a translation of your banana bread recipe on my blog http://croquonscru.blogspot.fr/ with a link to your website.
Aurore

25 votes
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Sure, go ahead and post on your blog!

You can't really keep recipes for very long unless you dehydrate ALL the moisture out of them (which would make everything really brittle and dry). So onion bread might keep for four days in a sealed container in a cupboard. I would keep banana bread in the fridge - probably for up to five days. Or you could freeze it

22 votes
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For vanilla, do you use a typical alcohol-based extract, or do you use glycerite?

25 votes
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I am not sure what glycerite is. I typically use pure organic vanilla extract  or sometimes vanilla bean (but the latter is expensive so not usually)

26 votes
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I have recently started making raw breads but I am unsure how to store them or how long they will last. Can you please help?

18 votes
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Hi, Do you think I could sub hemp hearts for the chia? I'm thinking part of the reason you need the chia is for the gloopy soluble fibre that it creates when moist.

19 votes
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You are totally right Liz, need chia for the gloop! Try using ground flax instead of chia seeds

HHearts are good but won't give you the necessary gloop :)

17 votes
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Can I used milled chia seeds instead of chia seeds? That is what I have right now.

18 votes
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Yeah sure! For this recipe either will work.

(Readers: milled just means ground up finely.)

24 votes
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Hi LJ,
Do the chia seeds need to be sprouted or soaked first??

24 votes
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No!! :)

24 votes
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Well, I bought a bunch of bananas the other day, and hubby went to the store later and bought more, having not noticed the bunch I had gotten. So, needless to say, I need to get busy and make good use of them. This sounds perfect! Thanks, Laura Jane!

25 votes
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Definitely a great way to use up nicely ripe bananas :)

Good for your hubby, though, for bringing home bananas for you. :) Shows thoughtfulness, regardless of the fact that you already had some on hand.

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