Recipe Directions

  • 1. Add all ingredients to food processor. Process well, until quite well blended but still chunky. 40 seconds or so.
  • 2. Spread onto two dehydrator sheets. Use parchment paper or Teflex sheets. (For the love of God, never use waxed paper!)
  • 3. Dehydrate for 1 hour at 115. After one hour score the crackers with a knife so that they’ll be easier to separate later. Dehydrate for another 6 hours at 105. After 6 hours flip crackers and remove parchment paper or Teflex sheets. Dehydrate for one more hour at 105 until dry and cracker-like!

The Rawtarian's Thoughts

By The Rawtarian

Raw flax cracker recipes... Yeah, I know, there are a zillion of recipes for raw flax dehydrator crackers online. But how many of them are actually really good standby recipes that you want to make again and again? For me, this is my favorite raw flax cracker recipe -- hands down.

What makes this recipe special? As always, I like how there aren't very many ingredients in it. But somehow, I think because of the walnuts, these crackers have a very nice, hearty, satisfying weight to them.

I like to eat one or two of these crackers when I'm feeling as though I need a raw flax cracker recipe that'll really fill me up... and that tastes great, too.

Do not use a high-speed blender for this recipe. A food processor will work much better. Dehydrating times can vary wildly depending on the season, the humidity and your dehydrator. The best thing to do is hang out at home and check on them every couple of hours until you get the hang of making crackers. Try not to nibble too much on these raw flax crackers before they're done!

Note: If you don't have a tomato, you can use an apple + 1/4 cup water instead of the tomato.

Recipe Photos

Nutrition Facts

Nutritional score: 77 out of 100
  • This recipe is very low in Carbohydrates.
  • This recipe is low in Calories, and Sodium.
  • This recipe is an excellent source of Vitamin E.
  • This recipe is a good source of Protein, Riboflavin, and Vitamin B6.
  • This recipe is a noteworthy source of Dietary Fiber, and Iron.

Amounts per 65 g (2 oz) suggested serving

NameAmount% Daily
Calories 264 11 %
Protein 8 g 15 %
Fat 23 g 29 %
Carbohydrates 10 g 3 %
Dietary Fiber 5 g 14 %
Sugars 2.1 g
Calcium 71 mg 7 %
Iron 1.8 mg 14 %
Sodium 354 mg 15 %
Source: USDA, The Rawtarian

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Comments and Reviews

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23 votes
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Hello, people, these are excellent crackers!! Try them please.

26 votes
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I am going shopping tomorrow and wil let you know!

22 votes
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I store them in a sealed container in my pantry. But if you aren't going to consume them within 5 days or so you better make sure they are VERY dry.

I usually tend to eat these within 4 or 5 days so storage is not an issue.

If you plan on storing them for longer, as I said, make sure they are very dry and have no moisture left. (A good way to tell is if you squeeze the cracker. If it "gives" it means there's still moisture in there.) I don't like my crackers TOO dry, so I like to keep them a bit moist and then I just make sure I eat them relatively quickly.

If you make these let me know what you think.

135 votes
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PS: You can also put these in a big ziploc bag and freeze them. Works really well. You can practically eat them right out of the freezer.

68 votes
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one question.do you mean degrees in your recipes if so if you dehidrate at 115 degrees your crackers are not raw anymore. 40 or 46 should be the limit higher than that your are destroying the enzymes. so you might as well put them in the oven....

54 votes
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One is Fahrenheit and the other is Celsius. You are in the same ballpark.

50 votes
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Hi Flores, thanks for your note. Actually, 105 degrees F seems to be the magic number that I am familiar with :)

148 votes
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I tried these, and they were awesome. Full of flavor, and very filling. The texture reminds me of bread. Mine were a little thick. I am making more now, and will try to make them
thinner and crunchier.

158 votes
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So glad you enjoyed, MomsTaxi! It's fun to play with thickness and texture to see what works best for you.

28 votes
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I'm going to try these guys tomorrow. How do you store them and how long are they good for? I'm a raw food newbie.

56 votes
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I am new to the raw food world. I just put a batch of these crackers in my dehydrater. If the magic number for keeping enzymes alive is 105 degrees, why does the recipe call for one hour at 115 first? I've been wondering as I have seen several recipes that start things out hotter at first. Very helpful website by the way!

45 votes
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Hi Kara,

Great question.

As you know, when dehydrating raw food it is important to keep the enzymes alive by dehydrating at 105 degrees Fahrenheit (40.6 degrees Celsius) or lower.

However, I recommend turning your dehydrator on “high” (145 degrees) for about 1.5 hours when first putting food in the dehydrator, and then decreasing the temperature to 105 degrees after 1.5 hours or so.

I suggest this because the initial warmer temperature will help to take away a lot of the moisture at first, and the thinking is that it takes a while for your dehydrator to climb up to “high” and it also takes quite a while for the food to actually get to the temperature that the dehydrator air is at so it is still safe for raw foodists.

One of the best side-effects of setting your temperature higher at first is that it’s good at getting rid of the initial moisture quite quickly. Increasing the temperature at the beginning of cooking time is common practice in the raw food community. If you are not mindful about turning the heat back down after 1.5 hours, yes, your food will be heated above 105 degrees. However, this risk is warranted. That initial heat blast can really save you a lot of time and can accelerate the dehydrating process by quite a bit, even by 50% sometimes.

For me, I do strive to live a 100% raw lifestyle; however, I also make some slight tweaks to the “rules” in order to ensure that I can stay raw over the long-term.

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