Recipe Directions

  • 1. Place almonds in food processor. Process until they look like slightly chunky "almond flour." REMOVE from food processor and dump into big bowl.
  • 2. Add psyllium husk, flax and salt to bowl that contains "almond flour" that you just made.
  • 3. Your food processor should now be empty. Add onions, garlic and lemon juice to your food processor. Process until quite liquidy, mushy and pourable.
  • 4. Dump onion mixture into the big bowl that contains your dry ingredients.
  • 5. Add 1/3 cup water to big bowl. Mix everything together with spoon. Add more water (1/8 cup) if necessary to get dry, doughlike texture that you can mold into loaves.
  • 6. Mold into six small loaves.
  • 7. Place directly onto dehydrator tray. Dehydrate at 145 degrees for 1 hour - then reduce temperature to 110 degrees. Dehydrate for another 6 hours or so. Tastes best if eaten right out of dehydrator, but can be stored in fridge for 4 days.

The Rawtarian's Thoughts

By The Rawtarian

Because I am always so excitable I think I may have blown my credibility. But this time I mean it - THIS IS SOFT, SUPPLE, CUTTABLE SAVORY RAW BREAD THAT HAS A CRUST!

Giving props where props are due, this overall concept of spongy raw bread recipes were first invented by Chef Ito (as far as I know). Then, I recently watched an excellent tutorial by the delicious Russell James, who inspired me to create simpler and cheaper version of his bread recipe. Our recipes differ in that my raw bread recipe above doesn't require almond pulp or coconut meat - since I never have either.

Also, psyllium husk is kind of crazy on your system since it is explosively fibrous, so don't eat too much of this at once :)

A couple more tips:

It is the psyllium that makes this raw bread recipe spongy and good. YOU MUST USE PSYLLIUM or this recipe won't work. Psyllium husk is pretty cheap - get a big bag of it at your health food store or you can order it online, but that's probably not necessary because I bet you can find it locally. 

Note: this recipe calls for psyllium husk and works best with it.  But if you must use psyllium powder and I can't stop you, note that psyllium powder equals one third the whole husks.  (In other words, use 1/3 cup psyllium powder or 1 cup psyllium husk in this recipe. I recommend using psyllium husk.)

Also, if your dehydrator doesn't have enough room for the height of these raw loaves - remove the tray above it. Cover the hole from the missing tray with aluminium (tin) foil.  Just tuck it in and wrap around.

Recipe Photos

Nutrition Facts

Nutritional score: 79 out of 100
  • This recipe is very low in Calories, and Carbohydrates.
  • This recipe is low in Sodium.
  • This recipe is a good source of Dietary Fiber, Riboflavin, and Vitamin E.
  • This recipe is a noteworthy source of Protein, Calcium, and Iron.

Amounts per 66 g (2 oz) suggested serving

NameAmount% Daily
Calories 196 8 %
Protein 6 g 11 %
Fat 14 g 18 %
Carbohydrates 14 g 4 %
Dietary Fiber 9 g 28 %
Sugars 2.1 g
Calcium 100 mg 10 %
Iron 1.3 mg 10 %
Sodium 294 mg 13 %
Source: USDA, The Rawtarian

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Comments and Reviews

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29 votes
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Hi Hannah, you are on a ROLL!  Oven does not work as a dehydrator in my experience. I suggest holding off on buying a dehydrator until you are really bored and feel limited by only being able to use a food processor and blender. I got my first dehydrator after I was raw for at least 6 months. In case you want to check out the options:

Best dehydrator is 9-tray excalibur, hands down. But... it is expensive! http://tinyurl.com/ah6o3qt

You can also get a Vegikiln - they are cheaper, white, not as "reputable" but they get the job done: http://tinyurl.com/avb59e3

You should get a 8-to-10-tray, and do not get a round dehydrator.

Hope this helps!

29 votes
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Big thanks for the recipe

27 votes
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Made this today. It turned out wonderfully! Very tasty. My skeptical husband said he is impressed! I replaced half of the onion with zucchini. For extra insurance, I mixed in some chia with the flax because my *fabulous* coffee grinder would not give me a fine consistency. Great recipe! Thanks! Going to try to insert an image: [IMG]http://i137.photobucket.com/albums/q233/antpeep23/rawbread_zpsf1d5fa4c.jpg[/IMG]
http://i137.photobucket.com/albums/q233/antpeep23/rawbread_zpsf1d5fa4c.jpg

25 votes
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Skeptical husbands are hard to impress so well done! Sounds like some nice tweaks, Alisa, especially the half-onion, half zucc... PS: Love your cutting board!

22 votes
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Thanks! Husband's a woodworker, so I have an enviable collection of them. Who knew that was a thing! :-)
PS - Brownies are next.

30 votes
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I am TOTALLY envious! Seriously! I go to a lovely restaurant that has an art gallery attached to it, and they sell beautiful cutting boards for a pretty penny. I always drool over them. I need a woodworker husband!

23 votes
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Hi,

This is currently in my dehydrator, I subbed zucchini for onion as I am trying to eat a sattvic diet.
Additionally, I added honey and cinnamon. It smells delicious !

I cannot wait to try !

27 votes
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Hi Radha, now why didn't I think about the zucc addition myself? I think that would provide the perfect texture and deonionize it a bit! Lol   One thing about honey is that it doesn't dehydrate (will never dry at these temps) so it might be good to do a different sweetener, but in this recipe you're not trying to get it completely dry anyway so it's probably good. Thanks for sharing your tips! Gets my creative juices flowing

29 votes
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I've been raw for about six years and now that I'm experimenting a bit more, ALL of your recipes are turning out to be the best in their category. Thank you.

23 votes
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Hi Bree, your comment makes me beam :)

27 votes
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Thank you so much! I love this recipe. Using all organic ingredients, it's costing around $3.75 a loaf. Is it possible to sub some of the raw almonds with walnut which is cheaper? Or any other suggestions to cut the cost

Posted from The Rawtarian App

25 votes
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Hi Maha in this recipe you could use sunflower seeds instead of the almonds

29 votes
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Can these loaves be frozen?

31 votes
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Yep, Rosalie, you can freeze these

24 votes
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I am wondering if this is still considered raw since it is heated to 145 degrees for an hour? I just got an excalibur dehydrator for Christmas and had wanted to make more of you recipes.

22 votes
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Hi Otillie, congrats on the new dehydrator!

As you know, when dehydrating raw food it is important to keep the enzymes alive by dehydrating at 105 degrees Fahrenheit (40.6 degrees Celsius) or lower.

However, I recommend turning your dehydrator on “high” (145 degrees) for about 1.5 hours when first putting food in the dehydrator, and then decreasing the temperature to 105 degrees after 1.5 hours or so.

I suggest this because the initial warmer temperature will help to take away a lot of the moisture at first, and the thinking is that it takes a while for your dehydrator to climb up to “high” and it also takes quite a while for the food to actually get to the temperature that the dehydrator air is at so it is still safe for raw foodists.

One of the best side-effects of setting your temperature higher at first is that it’s good at getting rid of the initial moisture quite quickly. Increasing the temperature at the beginning of cooking time is common practice in the raw food community. If you are not mindful about turning the heat back down after 1.5 hours, yes, your food will be heated above 105 degrees. However, this risk is warranted. That initial heat blast can really save you a lot of time and can accelerate the dehydrating process by quite a bit, even by 50% sometimes.

For me, I do strive to live a 100% raw lifestyle; however, I also make some slight tweaks to the “rules” in order to ensure that I can stay raw over the long-term.

19 votes
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Hope this sheds some light on the issue :) <3

21 votes
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My friend Abeba (aka the Krazy Kracker Lady) tested this recipe last night and fell in love with it! You bet she will be making all kinds of other versions of it using the basic recipe. I went out and bought the psyllium husks and can't wait to try it! Incredibly healthy and versatile. What a great invention, psyllium husks....who would have thought that it would make great bread!!

22 votes
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Hi Laurie, If you try it I would love to know how it turns out for you and what your thoughts are about psyllium husk :)

19 votes
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I love this recipe! I was craving a hamburger and used this recipe with sunflower seeds (allergic to almonds) to make the buns for sliders that definitely satisfied my craving.

The consistency is very dough-like and somewhat reminded me of masa. So, I decided to make tortilla chips. I cut the recipe in half, substituted fresh corn, onion, cilantro, and a slice of habanero for the onions and lime for the lemon juice. I used about a tsp per chip and flattened it with a tortilla press (between to oiled pieces of baking parchment.) They turned out perfect. I really would like to thank you for sharing this recipe. I'm using it as a base to experiment with a lot of different ideas.

23 votes
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And now you are inspiring me to make something new recipes out of these, Jayme! Love your idea. Thank you for sharing it!

22 votes
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AMAZING thank you tons

23 votes
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Glad you liked it. Love your picture of this recipe on FB!

24 votes
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:)

22 votes
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:)

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