Recipe Directions

  • 1. Peel the yam (AKA remove outer brown skin). Using a carrot peeler works great.
  • 2. Slice the yam into THIN SLICES using a MANDOLIN SLICER. This is a finicky recipe and it will only work if you use a mandolin slicer. You are making thin chips here. YAM CHIPS DO NOT WORK OR TASTE GOOD UNLESS THEY ARE THINLY SLICED, LIKE A THIN POTATO CHIP. DO NOT CHOP THEM LIKE FRIES, THEY WON'T DEHYDRATE PROPERLY IF YOU DO THAT. Sorry for yelling at you but it's true :)
  • 3. Place sliced yam slices onto a dehydrator sheet covered with parchment paper (do not put oil or salt or anything on the yam slices.)
  • 4. Dehydrate! Dehydrate on high for one hour, then reduce heat to 115 degrees. Dehydrate until they are dry, they will curl up and look like this photo. You will know that they are ready once they are crispy!
  • 5. Before eating, place chips in a ziploc bag. Sprinkle a tiny bit of olive oil (add way less than you think you will need, it only takes like, a tiny splash to coat them well and you don't want to over-oil them) in the sac. Shake and squish a bit inside the sac to distribute the oil. Once the oil is well distributed on the raw yam chips, add a bit of sea salt and any other flavoring that you like (like dill or onion powder or whatever).
  • 6. Eat immediately! They don't keep well once you've seasoned them with the oil and spices, so... eat immediately.

The Rawtarian's Thoughts

By The Rawtarian

Raw yam chips are a nice alternative to kale chips.

The hardest part about this raw yam chips recipe is owning a mandoline slicer. If you do not have one put it on your to-buy list for the next time you go to a big box store, like Wal-Mart or Target. They are inexpensive. I just bought mine recently for $19. I am so glad I bought one and I don't know why I didn't do it sooner!

A common mistake when making raw yam chips is:
1. Not cutting thin enough (Must use mandoline slicer!)
2. Adding the oil and stuff BEFORE dehydrating (DO NOT DO THIS!)

Recipe Photos

Nutrition Facts

Nutritional score: 68 out of 100
  • This recipe is very low in Fat.
  • This recipe is low in Carbohydrates, and Sodium.
  • This recipe is a good source of Vitamin C, and Vitamin B6.
  • This recipe is a noteworthy source of Dietary Fiber, and Vitamin E.

Amounts per 158 g (6 oz) suggested serving

NameAmount% Daily
Calories 237 10 %
Protein 2.3 g 4 %
Fat 7 g 9 %
Carbohydrates 42 g 12 %
Dietary Fiber 6 g 19 %
Sugars 0.75 g
Calcium 26 mg 3 %
Iron 0.85 mg 7 %
Sodium 304 mg 13 %
Source: USDA

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Comments and Reviews

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16 votes
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Sorry, not sure.  Try the lowest temp possible

15 votes
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Actually, I would say 145 degrees to replace the high setting, but overall I do not advocate using an oven to dehydrate cause I have never had a good experience doing so

20 votes
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Hi Laura-Jane!
I wish to buy a mandolin slicer. Which type of mandolin slicer do you use? What is the brand?
Thank you for this info.

Julie

18 votes
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I just looked in my kitchen, but my stupid slicer doesn't have any identifying marks on it! And I don't have the box anymore. Basically, I bought the first one I saw. it was pretty cheap ($25USD at a big box store), it's not fancy but it gets the job done. I didn't do any research at all. I just bought it at walmart.

Sorry, I know that's not very helpful!

21 votes
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Yes, it helps. You are telling me that I will certainly and easily find something that will work well. It helps. Thank you.

20 votes
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:)

17 votes
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Thank you for this. Most recipes I've used are terrible and don't explain what machines work best. And good to know not to season first! None of the other recipesentioned that one. Why is that?

18 votes
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Because oil and seasonings will affect how the chips dehydrate (length of time, etc) - especially the addition of oil

21 votes
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Be careful with the mandolin...I have sliced the tips of my fingers off (on sweet potatoes, no less) not using the guard.

17 votes
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Yikes- thanks for the reminder. Can happen in a split second I am sure

21 votes
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Yum. I just made these last night and started eating them right out of the dehydrator this morning without any oil or salt!

16 votes
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Yay! I am glad you liked the Stacey. Did you use a mandoline slicer ?

19 votes
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I'm assuming you mean sweet potato - since a yam is an African/Asian tuber that is rarely available in the US.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yam_(vegetable)

16 votes
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Wow, you learn something new every day! I didn't think about it much! It seems that I do mean the sweet potato, although in Canada and the USA both terms are used interchangeably: "The softer, orange-fleshed variety of sweet potato, commonly referred to as a yam in the United States" (from wikipedia)

"Yam or sweet potato, what in the world is it? Many people use these terms interchangeably both in conversation and in cooking, but they are really two different vegetables. "

But it does seem that there is a raw veg called a "yam" that is hard to find. So, yah, I do mean sweet potato. Thanks for your note :)

16 votes
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Yams and sweet potatoes are two different things. I used to think they were the same thing with different names, but they are not.

Yams are orange. They are good for endocrine issues.

Sweet potatoes are off-white.

I live in Canada and we have both here. I'm not sure about other parts of the world.

22 votes
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Speaking on behalf of the 'other parts of the world' down here in Australia the orange one is called sweet potato, although it also comes in a purplish variety known as kumara. Yam to us is a whitish vegetable.
The naming thing is tricky - it was a few years into raw recipes that I discovered that what the recipes meant by yellow squash was totally different to what we do - a yellow variety of what wikipedia calls 'pattypan squash'. Many of the US 'squash' varieties are known as 'pumpkin' down here, eg 'butternut pumpkin' - and have no association to squash.

Wikipedia, and the pictures on it, have since become my best raw reference friend...

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